The Everything Public Speaking Book: Delivering a Winning Presentation Every Time!

By Scott S. Smith | Go to book overview

Welcome to Company Outing

Ever since I saw the movie The Shining, I've been pretty sensitive to the dangers of overwork. You probably know the scene I'm thinking of. Shelley Duvall comes to check up on her husband Jack Nicholson's progress on the novel he's been slaving away at, and finds he's written over and over, “All work and no play makes Jack a dull boy.” That's right before he goes bonkers and tries to kill her with an axe. Since I've lately been detecting that same “Jack-like” glint in some of your eyes, especially the folks over in marketing, I think our company outing couldn't come at a better time.

All kidding aside, we've all been working incredibly hard the past few months. Taking on that massive D&R account meant our workload increased by more than 30 percent. For most of you, it meant long hours. It meant late nights. And it meant plenty of stress. But everyone at Jones & Robertson rose to the challenge. And as a result of all that extra effort, I'm proud to announce that we had our most successful quarter ever.

And that's something worth celebrating with a day off. So we've rented this fabulous club for your exclusive use for the entire day. I hope you'll find something to do you enjoy. Play tennis or golf, take a dip in the pool, or enjoy a steam in the sauna. Later on, we'll have a terrific barbecue out on the lake. Just one thing: you are officially forbidden to discuss anything at all having to do with D&R, the office, or work! Talking about work can make Jack a dull boy too! Today is about fun. Today is about rest and relaxation. You've had your weeks of “all work,” now it's time to play.

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