The Everything Public Speaking Book: Delivering a Winning Presentation Every Time!

By Scott S. Smith | Go to book overview

Farewell to a Departing Employee

Marcus Aurelius Antoninus, the Roman emperor and philosopher, once offered these wise words: “Loss is nothing else but change, and change is Nature's delight.” In thinking about how I might offer a fond farewell to Susan Atkinson, I had cause to think about those words. While we are sad to lose Susan, her departure from here is certain to be the delight, if not of Nature Herself, then certainly of all who are fortunate to work with her in the future.

Susan first came to Lerner, Lerner and Kaye in 1990, as a first year associate who had just graduated with distinction from New York University Law School. We knew she was special right from day one, when she was thrust into the morass of the Ryan vs. Ryan case, and proved herself much more than capable; her long hours, her careful research, and her instrumental input all played an important part in our success with that case. On all of the cases that Susan became involved with since then, she continued to impress all of the partners and senior associates with whom she worked.

I know that Bob Abrams, who served as Susan's mentor, will particularly miss her. But Bob also told me that Susan has learned all he has to teach her, and that it is indeed the time for her to move on to bigger and better things. When Susan was offered an opportunity to come in as a partner at Weiss Weinberg, he encouraged her to take it with his blessing.

And so it is that we will have to say farewell to Susan. Susan, we thank you for all that you have done for us over the years. We thank you for your hard work. We thank you for being a friendly colleague and co-worker, whose warmth and good humor have continually brightened the halls of this office. We will sorely miss you, but we wish you the best of luck in your new position.

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