Bad Fruits of the Civilized Tree: Alcohol and the Sovereignty of the Cherokee Nation

By Izumi Ishii | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

I first encountered Cherokee history in my sophomore year at Sophia University, Tokyo, Japan. Since then, a number of professors, colleagues, and friends have both intellectually and personally assisted me in my efforts to contribute to our understanding of that history. Without their immeasurable support and encouragement, I would not have completed this work. First and foremost I would like to thank my graduate school mentors Theda Perdue and Michael D. Green, for faithfully directing my academic work. Consistently expressing genuine interest in my work, Green guided me with fatherly support and encouragement as well as insightful and invaluable advice. Perdue urged me to work hard and accomplish my goal with her loving “carrot-and-stick approach” (as she calls it) and great patience. Her motherly love and giggles have saved me on numerous occasions from reaching a dead end in my graduate life and even after. I am greatly indebted to both of them. They have constantly cultivated and reinforced my self-confidence, and they continue to inspire me. I will carry with me the lessons I have learned from them throughout my academic career.

I also wish to thank the scholars who served on my doctoral committee. Ronald D. Eller, Kathi Kern, Armando J. Prats, Tom Appleton, and Richard W. Jefferies kindly read

-xi-

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Bad Fruits of the Civilized Tree: Alcohol and the Sovereignty of the Cherokee Nation
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Indians of the Southeast ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Series Preface ix
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Introduction 1
  • 1: Alcohol Arrives 13
  • 2: A Struggle for Sovereignty 39
  • 3: The Moral High Ground 59
  • 4: Alcohol and Dislocation 83
  • 5: A Nation Under Siege 111
  • 6: Cherokee Temperance, American Reform, and Oklahoma Statehood 133
  • Conclusion 165
  • Notes 169
  • Bibliography 219
  • Index 245
  • In the Indians of the Southeast Series 261
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