Comanche Ethnography: Field Notes of E. Adamson Hoebel, Waldo R. Wedel, Gustav G. Carlson, and Robert H. Lowie

By E. Adamson Hoebel; Waldo R. Wedel et al. | Go to book overview

Lowie's 1912 Field Notes

{Page 1}

Lawton, Oklahoma, June 8.

I have been here several days waiting for Harrington's5 interpreter, Mr. Hope M. Fulbright.6

Dr. Rowell,7 who is married to a Kiowa woman, told me that all the K{iowa} women pull out their eyebrows, by which token they may readily be distinguished from the Comanches (?). He also says (as does Mooney8) that the K{iowas} had a Rabbit society that must be entered before any other. Whether the other societies were also graded, he does not know, but he will inquire.

The claw hammer9 type of pappose board is said to be common to both the Kiowas and the Comanches.

I myself saw a Comanche man today whose eyebrows had been completely removed.

1. See Introduction to the 1933 Field Party.

2. See Introduction to the 1933 Field Party.

3. Wahkinney (wakarée, 'turtle') is listed in the Family Record Book as forty-five years old in 1901,
but he is not listed on any census before 1892. He was a member of Tischecoddy's Kwaharunuu local
band.

4. Cavayo (from the Spanish caballo 'horse') was a born about 1860 and a member of Tahpony's
Yapainuu local band.

5. Presumably, this refers to Mark R. Harrington (1882–1971), who, a few years earlier, had made
collections in western Oklahoma for Gustav G. Heye's Museum of the American Indian. John Peabody
Harrington of the Smithsonian did not visit the Kiowa Agency until 1917, and he worked only with the
Kiowas.

6. Hope M. Fulbright was born in Texas in 1876, and came to Fort Sill and the Kiowa Agency in
1892, where he served in various positions. He also worked at the Red Store. Fulbright learned the
Comanche language quickly, serving, as noted by Lowie, as interpreter for Mark Harrington. He was also
one of the early interpreters at Deyo Mission. My thanks to Wahnee Clark for this information.

7. Dr. James Frederick Rowell (1874–1951) arrived at Anadarko around 1900 to serve as the Kiowa
Agency physician. He married a Kiowa woman, Mahbone. Their descendants include Dr. Everett
Rhoades, who, from 1982 to 1983, was United States Assistant Surgeon General and head of the Indian
Health Service. Again, my thanks to Wahnee Clark.

8.Mooney 1898:230 (?).

9. I know of no other published description of Kiowa or Comanche cradles as “claw hammer.” The
more recent term is “lattice back.”

-484-

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