Comanche Ethnography: Field Notes of E. Adamson Hoebel, Waldo R. Wedel, Gustav G. Carlson, and Robert H. Lowie

By E. Adamson Hoebel; Waldo R. Wedel et al. | Go to book overview
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APPENDIX C
Sources of Ethnobotanical Information
in Carlson and Jones (1940)

In Appendix C, I have attempted to correlate the entries in Table 1 of Carlson and Jones' Some Uses of Plants by the Comanche Indians (1940) with their sources in the extant notes. Spelling of the Comanche botanical terms has been normalized to that given in Robinson and Armagost (1990) and the Comanche Cultural Committee (2003).1 The list is in the order of the scientific name in Carlson and Jones.

Carlson's extant notes do not include any Comanche botanical materials. About two-thirds of the terms detailed in the Carlson and Jones article appear in Wedel's notes.2 Presumably the remainder were in Carlson's now-missing notes. The missing terms are marked “Unattested.” Most of them can be identified and normalized with the Comanche dictionaries. Those that are not in the dictionaries appear in roman type in angle brackets.

For four entries, Carlson and Jones lists the Comanche name as “Not Recorded.” However, three of the four had, in fact, been solicited by the Field Party. They have been supplied.

CARLSON AND JONES (1940) CONCORDANCE

1. In one case, Allium, I have used a slightly different transcription; see the note on that entry.

2. Carlson did, obliquely, credit Wedel as their source: “Mr. Carlson is responsible for the field
notes, native terms, and phonetics. Dr. Waldo R. Wedel coöperated with him in the collection of the field
data” (1940:518).

3. Post Oak Jim (July 12, p.139) gives this as pa 'water', kuukA 'onion'. Carlson and Jones (1940)
has it as 'large onion'.

4. The Field Party was fairly consistent in transcribing the Comanche morpheme tue 'small' as
some variant of “tidi.” Thus, Wedel spells this tÂdie kÂ:k and Carlson and Jones (1940) transcribes it as
tʔdiekø:k, both translated as 'small onion'. I have given it as tuekuukA. Both Robinson and Armagost
(1990) and the Comanche Cultural Committee (2003) give it as tuetutaatukuukA

-511-

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