Your Career Game: How Game Theory Can Help You Achieve Your Professional Goals

By Nathan Bennett; Stephen A. Miles | Go to book overview
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CONCLUSION

One day Alice came to a fork in the road and saw a Cheshire cat in a
tree. “Which road do I take?” she asked. “Where do you want to go?”
was his response. “I don't know,” Alice answered. “Then,” said the
cat, “it doesn't matter.”

Lewis Carroll, Alice's Adventures in Wonderland

If you have read this far, it is a safe bet that you are more certain about where you want to go than Alice. Understanding where you want to go, where you are now, and how you came this far all matter in the career game—as does understanding where to start. Our purpose in this book is to share our thoughts on how you can use game theory concepts to better understand your career, to evaluate the impact that others might have as supporters or competitors, and to make moves that are more effective as you pursue your objective. Our contention is that game theory provides a useful framework for these purposes because, like the other situations in which it has been fruitfully applied, your career game involves interdependent players with varied motives, complex reward systems, and evolving playing conditions.In several places, we note that your career game is highly personal. Your goals, your talents, your predilection to risk, your game history to date, and characteristics of your fellow players are unique to your situation. Based on this uniqueness, what we offer in conclusion is a bit different from what is commonly found in business books. We don't have a precise set of laws, habits, or rules that can be simply adopted in an effort to increase your odds of getting from where you are to where you want to go. Instead, we pose a number of questions—you must provide the individual answers that characterize your own career game. We think that, if you can do that well, the moves you need to make will become apparent to you.
Where do you want to take your career? If, like Alice in Wonderland, you don't know, then you need not address any of the questions that follow. If, however, like Dave Barry, you have observed that many others are

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