History and Health Policy in the United States: Putting the Past Back In

By Rosemary A. Stevens; Charles E. Rosenberg et al. | Go to book overview

Contributors

Robert A. Aronowitz, MD, is an associate professor of history and sociology of science and family practice and community medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. His research interests are in the history of twentieth-century disease, epidemiology, and population health. He is the author of Making Sense of Illness: Science, Society, and Disease (1998) and is currently completing a book on the history of breast cancer.

Lawrence Brown, a political scientist, is a professor of health policy and management at Columbia University. His research interests include health-policy analysis and formation and the politics of health care. In recent years his research has focused on health-care reform, including Medicaid and Medicare policies and managed care. He has also studied the provision of medical care for the uninsured.

Alexandra P. Burns, JD, is an attorney in private practice. Her interests include the intersections between state responsibility and private duty.

Lawton Robert Burns, Ph.D., MBA, is the James Joo-Jin Kim Professor and a professor in the Departments of Health Care Systems and Management at the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania. He is also the director of the Wharton Center for Health Management and Economics. He is the author of The Health Care Value Chain (2002) and The Business of Health Care Innovation (2005).

Robert Cook-Deegan is a former physician and molecular biologist who turned to health policy and research policy in 1982 when he joined the congressional Office of Technology Assessment as a science fellow. After six years at OTA, he joined the staff of the National Institutes of Health for one year as its Human Genome Project was beginning. He then worked for eleven years at the Institute of Medicine and the National Research Council before joining the faculty of Duke University in 2002, as the director of the Center for Genome Ethics, Law, and Policy, Institute for Genome Sciences and Policy.

Amy L. Fairchild is an assistant professor in the Department of Sociomedical Sciences at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health. She is the author of Science at the Borders: Immigrant Medical Inspection and the Shaping of the Modern Industrial Labor Force (2003). Her work at the intersection of history, ethics, and politics has appeared in Science, American Journal of Public Health, Bulletin of the History of Medicine, and Journal of the American Medical Association.

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