Weaving the Past: A History of Latin America's Indigenous Women from the Prehispanic Period to the Present

By Susan Kellogg | Go to book overview

NOTES

1. Introducing the Indigenous Women of Latin America

1. Silverblatt 1987. Important literature on women and the rise of states is described in Silverblatt 1988 and 1991.

2. See Anton 1973; Bossen 1984; and Rosenbaum 1996 for comparative works on indigenous women in Middle and South America. For overviews or collections of essays on North American indigenous women, see Niethammer 1977; Green 1980; Albers and Medicine 1983; Albers 1989; Klein and Ackerman 1995; Shoemaker 1995; Johnston 1996; and Ford 1997.

3. Examples include Benería 1982; Benería and Feldman 1992; Bose and AcostaBelen 1995; Deere 1990; Deere and León 1982; Deere, Humphries, and León 1982; Leacock and Safa 1986; Marchand and Parpart 1995; Mies, Bennholdt-Thomsen, and von Werlhof 1988; Momsen and Kinnaird 1993; and Nash and Fernández-Kelly 1983.

4. Mohanty 1991 discusses the ways scholars have systematically silenced women of the so-called Third World and failed to chronicle their agency and activism.

5. Gayle Rubin distinguishes between sex and gender (1975); Judith Butler argues that sex is gender (1990: 6–13); and Kamala Visweswaran describes how various forms of hierarchy and discrimination shape gender performances (1997: 59–60), leading me to argue that identity is as much inscribed, through a complex interplay of social and biological forces, as it is performed.

6. Allman, Geiger, and Musisi 2002: 3–4.

7. Meisch 1991.

8. Ortner 2001: 78–9. Also see Ortner 1996: 6–12, 16–8, as well as Sahlins 1981; Guha 1983; and many of the essays in Montoya, Frazier, and Lessig 2002.

9. See Gailey 1987a for a thorough discussion of this literature and the many explanations offered to explain gender asymmetry.

10. Quinn 1977: 182; also see Mukhopadhyay and Higgens 1988; Meigs 1990; and Crown 2000a. For Ortner's discussion of status, see 1996: 140–7 (quotation on 140).

11. Monaghan 2001: 287–8 (quotation on 287). Also see Harris's seminal article (1978) on this concept.

12. Silverblatt 1987: 5–7, 31–8, 47–66; Kellogg 1988: 676; and Wood and Haskett 1997: 317–9.

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