Thomas Jefferson: A Biography

By Nathan Schachner | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 35 Federalist and Republican

JEFFERSON had come into his office with the greatest reluctance; and the longer he remained the greater became his anxiety to get out. He hated the political passions that had been aroused and which spilled over into private relations; he loathed the constant strife with Hamilton, the Federalists in Congress and their massed cohorts; he was unutterably weary of battling unsuccessfully and in vain against measures he was certain were tending to ruin the country.

It was true he was not alone in the struggle. A substantial party was gradually building up around him and looking to him for leadership; but as yet he did not view it as a party, nor do anything to solidify it as a workable instrument, as a tool in the struggle for power. That would come later.

In the meantime, he wished merely to be rid of it all; to retire to his tents in Monticello and bask in the bosom of his family. Every letter, every utterance, breathes the desperate sincerity of this longing. He panted, he exclaimed to his daughter Martha, to exchange "labor, envy, and malice for ease, domestic occupation, and domestic love and society; where i may once more be happy with you, with Mr. Randolph and dear little Anne [his granddaughter], with whom even Socrates might ride on a stick without being ridiculous."1

He had a sufficient sense of his obligations, however, to realize that it would be unfair to resign until at least the end of the Presidential term, and he very early made his wishes confidentially known to Washington. The President had attempted to dissuade him; but his resolve was fixed, he said, and unalterable. This was at the beginning of 1792; but already he was looking forward to the day of his release. "The ensuing year," he told Martha, "will be the longest of my life, and the last of such hateful labors; the next we will sow our cabbages together."2

If Washington had tried to dissuade him, it was not because he was not sympathetic. In fact, Washington himself was looking forward to the end of his term as the last of his adventures in public office, just as Monticello beckoned to Jefferson, so did Mount Vernon possess irresistible attractions for Washington. Barely had Jefferson made clear his own determination when Washington informed him that he too intended to retire.

Jefferson let it pass at the moment but, as domestic and foreign affairs took a turn for the worse, he became convinced that the one man who might be able to ride out the storm, hold the contending factions together

-462-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Thomas Jefferson: A Biography
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 1074

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.