Beyond Isabella: Secular Women Patrons of Art in Renaissance Italy

By Sheryl E. Reiss; David G. Wilkins | Go to book overview
Contents
Illustrationsviii
Prologuexv
Acknowledgmentsxxi
Frequently Cited Sources and Abbreviationsxxii
Introduction: Recognizing New Patrons, Posing New Questions David G. Wilkins1
Fina da Carrara, née Buzzacarini: Consort, Mother, and Patron of Art in Trecento Padua Benjamin G. Kohl19
Controlling Women or Women Controlled? Suggestions for Gender Roles and Visual Culture in the Italian Renaissance Palace Roger J. Crum37
The Women Patrons of Neri di Bicci Rosi Prieto Gilday51
Caterina Piccolomini and the Palazzo delle Papesse in Siena A. Lawrence Jenkens77
Renaissance Husbands and Wives as Patrons of Art: The Camerini of Isabella d'Este and Francesco II Gonzaga Molly Bourne93
Widow, Mother, Patron of Art: Alfonsina Orsini de' Medici Sheryl E. Reiss125
Two Emilian Noblewomen and Patronage Networks in the Cinquecento Katherine A. McIver159
Dutiful Widows: Female Patronage and Two Marian Altarpieces by Parmigianino Mary Vaccaro177
Vittoria Colonna and the Commission for a Mary Magdalen by Titian Marjorie Och193
Bronzino in the Service of Eleonora di Toledo and Cosimo I de' Medici: Conjugal Patronage and the Painter-Courtier Bruce L. Edelstein225
A Medici Miniature: Juno and a Woman with "Eyes in Her Head Like Two Stars in Their Beauty" Gabrielle Langdon263
A Widow's Choice: Alessandro Allori's Christ and the Adulteress in the Church of Santo Spirito at Florence Elizabeth Pilliod301
Matrons and Motives: Why Women Built in Early Modern Rome Carolyn Valone317
About the Contributors337

-vii-

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