Thomas Jefferson: A Biography

By Nathan Schachner | Go to book overview

General Bibliography
The number of volumes that have been written on and around Jefferson is truly staggering; the manuscripts, scattered in collections great and small throughout the country, run literally into the hundreds of thousands. The two decades that the author has devoted to the research, contemplation and writing of three related lives--Aaron Burr, Alexander Hamilton and Thomas Jefferson--have now been brought to a conclusion. It is his belief that through the clash of personalities and political ideas of these three key figures the formative years of the American nation may be studied to advantage.The published writings of Thomas Jefferson have thus far been woefully inadequate. The best to date is the compilation by Paul Leicester Ford, chiefly political in character. The worst are the more numerous volumes known either as the Monticello or the Memorial edition. Errors of transcription, of dates, of attributions abound on almost every page. Fortunately, the monumental edition of The Papers of Thomas Jefferson, under the direction of Julian P. Boyd, as editor, and Lyman C. Butterfield and others as associates, is now well under way. The three volumes already published out of a total of fifty-two are models of clarity, accuracy and meticulous editing; the success of the entire venture seems well assured.Most of the abbreviations in the Notes appended to this book should furnish no difficulty to the inquiring student. Some few which may are herewith listed:
Works, Ford: The Federal Edition of the Works of Jefferson, edited by P. L. Ford.
Writings, Mont: The Monticello or Memorial Edition of the Writings of Jefferson, edited by Lipscomb and Bergh.
LC.: The Library of Congress.

The author has received almost uniformly cordial co-operation from busy librarians and custodians of the great manuscript collections. His grateful thanks are herewith rendered to each and every one of them. They helped make an almost impossible task possible.

Thanks are also extended to the institutions and individuals who have permitted investigation of their treasures and gave permission to print excerpts therefrom.

New York, June 1, 1951

NATHAN SCHACHNER

-1049-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Thomas Jefferson: A Biography
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 1074

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.