The Military Genius of Abraham Lincoln: An Essay

By Colin R. Ballard | Go to book overview

XVIII
GRANT IN THE WEST

Lincoln and Grant.

I HAVE never been able to get away from a suspicion that it was the bad report circulated about Grant which first attracted Lincoln's sympathy towards him. We cannot know all that was said, but some idea of the colour of it may be seen in the following dispatches:

Halleck to McClellan, 2nd March 1862 (a fortnight after the taking of Fort Donelson):

'I have had no communication with General Grant for over a week. He left his command without my authority and went to Nashville. It is hard to censure a successful general immediately after a victory but I think he richly deserves it. I can get no returns, no reports, no information of any kind from him. Satisfied with his victory he sits down and enjoys it without any regard for the future.'

McClellan to Halleck, March 3rd:

'Your despatch of last evening received. The success of our cause demands that proceedings such as Grant's should be at once checked. Do not hesitate to arrest him at once if the good of the service requires it, and place C. F. Smith in command. You are at liberty to regard this as a positive order if it will smooth your way.'

Halleck to McClellan, March 4th:

'A rumor has just reached me that Grant has resume his former bad habits. If so it will account for his repeated neglect of my oft repeated orders. I do not deem it advisable to arrest. him at present. . . . .'

Halleck to Grant, March 6th:

' General McClellan directs that you report to me daily the number and position of the forces under your command. Your

-185-

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The Military Genius of Abraham Lincoln: An Essay
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface v
  • Contents *
  • List of Sketch Maps *
  • Illustrations *
  • LIST OF AUTHORS CONSULTED *
  • I - AN UNCONVENTIONAL STRATEGIST 1
  • II - THE GREAT ILLUSION 10
  • III - FROM LOG CABIN TO WHITE HOUSE 22
  • IV - THE SITUATION 38
  • V - FIRST BULL RUN 51
  • VI - ALL QUIET ON THE POTOMAC 62
  • VII - THE SHENANDOAH VALLEY 77
  • VIII - THE PENINSULA 91
  • IX - Lincoln AND McClellan 103
  • X - SECOND BULL RUN 114
  • XI - ANTIETAM 121
  • XII - THE MULES OF FREDERICK 129
  • XIII - EMANCIPATION 138
  • XIV - FREDERICKSBURG 146
  • XV - CHANCELLORSVILLE 153
  • XVI - GETTYSBURG 160
  • XVII - THE WEST 172
  • XVIII - GRANT IN THE WEST 185
  • XIX - 1864 201
  • XX - THE LAST PHASE 222
  • XXI - CONCLUSION 229
  • Index 243
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