This Is England: British Film and the People's War, 1939-1945

By Neil Rattigan | Go to book overview
Illustrations
The First of the Few. Unproblematic Englishness. Deep England, the "natural" setting for a middle-class airplane designer, R. M. Mitchell, and his public school chum, RAF officer, Geoff Crisp.
54
The Demi-Paradise. Upper-class patrician shipyard owner Runalow "seduces" Soviet engineer Ivan Kouznetsoff with Victorian values, English eccentricity, technical know-how, and tea: "At once a poem and a beverage."
66
In Which We Serve. "I want to see my captain." A mortally wounded seaman seeks upper- class permission to die. Captain Kinross obliges.
90
Convoy. Lower-class devotion. Bates, the servant, waits with a change of uniform, for Captain Armitage, returning stained but unruffled from stiff upper-lipped leadership in action.
101
The Way to the Stars. The three strata of British class clearly delineated. Upper-class leader Archdale watches over middle-class "fifteen-hour sprog" Penrose dealing with working-class grumbling fitter, who is nameless.
118
One of Our Aircraft is Missing. Upper-class leadership naturally asserts itself: Sir Geoffrey takes the initiative throughout, even in leading the other, younger men in physical action.
135
The Foreman Went to France. Working-class initiated and led action and working-class sacrifice: the death of Jock, the Scots private.
145

-9-

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This Is England: British Film and the People's War, 1939-1945
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 3
  • Contents 7
  • Illustrations 9
  • Acknowledgements 13
  • Introduction 15
  • I - Fictional Feature Films 37
  • 1: National Identity and Upper-Class Images the Films 39
  • 2: Leaders Leading the Films 75
  • 3: All in It Together the Films 128
  • 4: [Strange, Wonderful, Incalculable Creatures] the Films 182
  • 5: The Strange Case of the Life and Death of Colonel Blimp 213
  • II - Documentaries 233
  • 6: Documentary's Moment 235
  • 7: Off to a Flying False Start 253
  • 8: The Docudramas 264
  • 9: A Special Case 297
  • 10: The Myth of British Wartime Cinema 310
  • Notes 320
  • Select Bibliography 333
  • Filmography 345
  • Index 348
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