This Is England: British Film and the People's War, 1939-1945

By Neil Rattigan | Go to book overview

Notes

INTRODUCTION

1. The Heart of Britain, 1941. Crown Film Unit, directed by Humphrey Jennings.

2. I have noted in several analyses the indicators that many of these films were made with one eye at least on American audiences. I have also accepted that the images of Britain being presented may well have modified the realities of the class system toward a more "democratic" perception because of the importance given to influencing the population of the United States. I feel it can be taken as read that no such fine sensitivity existed with regard to Commonwealth audiences, whom, it could be assumed by the propagandists, were already supportive of Britain—or at least their governments were. Australia, for one, became less enthusiastic about sending its manpower to the aid of Britain after Japan entered the war and its troops arrived on Australia's doorstep soon after. The propagandists were not especially concerned with the sensitivity of colonial audiences to the British class system as the colonized countries had little or no choice in the matter of supporting Britain, irrespective of what the members of those audiences may think about it.

3. For this terminology as well as the concept of "explicit," "implicit," and "symptomatic" meaning, I am indebted to David Bordwell's Making Meaning: Inference and Rhetoric in the Interpretation of Cinema (Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 1989), 8–9.

4. A recent work on documentary by Brian Winston, Claiming the Real: The Griersonian Documentary and Its Legitimations (1995) confirms the surmise I arrive at from a different direction.

5. Although I have adopted the term "Deep England" as a consequence of Calder's use, Patrick Wright implies that he coined the term in his work, On Living in an Old Country (1985). Wright uses it, initially without capitalization, and asserts that "I adapted a phrase from one of François Mitterrand's election posters to describe this idealised southern geography as 'deep England.' It was Dorset I had in mind then" (Wright 1996, xii). There is nothing in Calder (1991) to indicate a source for the term, although he explores the concept and its pertinence to the "Myth of the Blitz," in some detail.

6. The extent to which the cinematic Mitchell is not the real Mitchell is emphasized in a very curious way with the re-release onto video tape of The First of the Few to celebrate its fiftieth anniversary in 1992. he videotape contains an introduc

-320-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
This Is England: British Film and the People's War, 1939-1945
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 3
  • Contents 7
  • Illustrations 9
  • Acknowledgements 13
  • Introduction 15
  • I - Fictional Feature Films 37
  • 1: National Identity and Upper-Class Images the Films 39
  • 2: Leaders Leading the Films 75
  • 3: All in It Together the Films 128
  • 4: [Strange, Wonderful, Incalculable Creatures] the Films 182
  • 5: The Strange Case of the Life and Death of Colonel Blimp 213
  • II - Documentaries 233
  • 6: Documentary's Moment 235
  • 7: Off to a Flying False Start 253
  • 8: The Docudramas 264
  • 9: A Special Case 297
  • 10: The Myth of British Wartime Cinema 310
  • Notes 320
  • Select Bibliography 333
  • Filmography 345
  • Index 348
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 360

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.