Ethics and the Practice of Architecture

By Barry Wasserman; Patrick Sullivan et al. | Go to book overview

WORKS RECOMMENDED
FOR FURTHER STUDY

Throughout the text, in addition to the works directly quoted and cited, a number of Notes recommended books and articles for further reading for in-depth consideration of various topics. Other books have been cross-referenced to explain concepts being discussed. The list of recommended works has been consolidated here with their explanatory notes.


BASIC INTRODUCTIONS TO ETHICS:

Almond, Brenda. Exploring Ethics: A Traveller's Tale. Malden, MA: Blackwell Publishers, 1998. A longer introduction than Pojman or Rachels, which presents basic ethical themes and additional themes of free will, autonomy, diversity, and justice within a lively narrative dialogue.

Cavalier, Robert J., James Guinlock, and James P. Sterba, ed. Ethics in the History of Western Philosophy. New York: St. Martin's Press, c. 1989. Addresses central figures (Plato, Aristotle, Augustine, Aquinas, Hume, Kant, Mill, Hegel, Nietzsche, Sartre, and Rawls) and their ethical thought.

MacIntyre, Alasdair. A Short History of Ethics: A history of moral philosophy from the Homeric Age to the twentieth century. New York: Collier Books, Macmillan Publishing, c. 1966. The best brief introduction to the course of Western ethical thought through time.

Norman, Richard. The Moral Philosophers: An Introduction to Ethics. 2nd ed. New York: Oxford University Press, 1998. Includes concise explanative essays and bibliographies of the primary works of the central figures in Western ethics.

Pojman, Louis P. Ethics: Discovering Right and Wrong. 2nd ed. Belmont, CA: Wadsworth Publishing Company, 1994. A thorough introduction to ethical concepts that cover ethical reasoning, relativism, egoism, Utility and other consequentialist theories, Kantian and other deontic theories, virtue ethics, and social-contract theory.

Rachels, James. The Elements of Moral Philosophy, 2nd ed. New York: McGraw-Hill, Inc., 1993. An alternative to Pojman; another thorough introduction to ethical concepts.

Robinson, Dave, and Chris Garrett. Introducing Ethics, ed. Richard Appignanesi. New York: Totem Books, c. 1996. A lively, brief, illustrated introduction to the major moral questions, disputes, and philosophers, with good coverage of late-twentieth-century applied ethics problems and Continental philosophers.

Singer, Peter, ed. A Companion to Ethics, Blackwell Companions to Philosophy. Cambridge, MA: Blackwell, c.1991, 1993. The best single source. It expands upon the themes in the already mentioned works with sections on global ethical traditions; religious ethical traditions; contemporary applied ethics concerns such as poverty, euthanasia, and environmentalism; and critiques of the Western traditions such as those launched by Marxism and feminism.

Trusted, Jennifer. Moral Principles and Social Values. London: Routledge and Kegan Paul, 1987. Includes judgments, facts, values, the law, politics, and rights in her introductory work.


ON THE ETHICS OF LYING AND
REPRESENTATION:

Bok, Sissela. Lying: Moral Choices in Public and Private Life. New York: Pantheon Books, 1978. Bok is arguably the premier contemporary ethicist who has examined the ethics of lying.

Bok, Sissela. Secrets: On the Ethics of Concealment and Revelation. New York: Pantheon Books, 1982.

-309-

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Ethics and the Practice of Architecture
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface ix
  • Introduction 1
  • Part I - Awareness 10
  • Part II - Understanding 104
  • Part III - Choices 178
  • Epilogue 258
  • Appendix I 259
  • Appendix II 269
  • Appendix III 275
  • Appendix IV 285
  • Notes to the Text 293
  • Works Cited in the Notes 305
  • Works Recommended for Further Study 309
  • Additional Architectural References 313
  • Additional Information about the Photographs 317
  • Index 319
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