Jewish Daily Life in Germany, 1618-1945

By Marion A. Kaplan | Go to book overview

16
Work

Emancipation and industrialization were the motors of Jewish economic ascent, defined simply as the rise from peddling and irregular trades into that of the "respectable tradesman or merchant with an open shop or office and a fixed address."1 Emancipation gave Jews freedom of movement and allowed them to take up almost all occupations. With the growth of the industrial and commercial economies, small family shops grew into larger enterprises and the rise of the railroads made deliveries to small and, later, larger shops easier and cheaper, eliminating the need for most peddlers. The profits from growing businesses went into the further educations of sons or the expansion of businesses. For a few, it could mean the acquisition of spectacular wealth.


Vocational Profile

Jews were tradespeople. Their occupational profile—based on past and contemporary discrimination and on economic trends—differed from that of most other Germans. Antisemites had long argued that "money grubbing" Jews preferred business and avoided productive work, thus setting themselves apart from an idealistic German work ethic. During the Emancipation era, some Jews and many Germans urged Jews to "normalize" their occupations, to seek a job distribution similar to that of the majority, concentrated in industry and agriculture. They argued that people who sought civil rights should become "productive," a word that meant agriculture and trades for boys and housekeeping for girls. The language of "productivity" reinforced antiquated notions of trade and commerce as "unproductive" and thus exploitative.2 It is not surprising, therefore, that some Jewish organizations promoted crafts and agriculture, trying to prove that Jews contributed to the fatherland rather than "exploited" it.

-215-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Jewish Daily Life in Germany, 1618-1945
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 529

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.