Jewish Daily Life in Germany, 1618-1945

By Marion A. Kaplan | Go to book overview

Conclusion

1703: The Purchase of Houses and Other Real Estate by Jews," a Prussian document,
stated that a Jew who bought a house from a Christian had to sell his previous house to
another Christian, "so that in this way, the number of Jewish houses "Juden-Häuser"
would not be increased."1

1803: On May 9, 1803, all of us Schutzjuden "Protected Jews" here and in Nenndorf were
summoned at the behest of the local merchants and . . . towns. . . . That is, the
merchants had petitioned the court to the effect that we should not engage in com-
merce, sell from door to door, or employ many . . . clerks. We then presented a docu-
ment of protest. . . . "After their success" we heard no more of the matter. May God
continue to grant peace to us and all Israel."2

1905: We moved to Stettin. There a delightful time began for all of us. The schools were
excellent and we felt happy there. Stettin was a very liberal city, friendly to the Jews.
. . . There was a lively spirit in the Jewish community. . . . Lectures were presented
regularly in the Literary Society . . . "and" . . . the Jewish Gymnastics Club was
founded."3

Late 1930s to early 1940s: A man from a Jewish family who had been baptized at birth
and was married to a non-Jew went for a walk with his son, who had been drafted into
the army. "Both of them were tired and wanted to rest in a park. But . . . the father
was allowed to sit only on one of the benches for Jews, which the son in uniform of
course was not allowed to touch."4

The daily lives of Jews in the German lands and, later, in Germany, present us with multiple and often contradictory impressions. As the opening quotations

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