Jewish Daily Life in Germany, 1618-1945

By Marion A. Kaplan | Go to book overview
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Notes

Introduction

1. The literature is enormous. For an introduction, see Jacob Katz, From Prejudice to Destruction: Anti-Semitism, 1700-1933 (Cambridge, Mass., 1980); Peter Pulzer, The Rise of Political Anti-Semitism in Germany and Austria, 2nd ed. (Cambridge, Mass., 1988).

2. On emancipation, see Reinhard Rürup, Emanzipation und Antisemitismus: Stu dien zur "Judenfrage" in der bürgerlichen Gesellschaft (Göttingen, 1975); Jacob Toury, Die politische Orientierungen der Juden in Deutschland. Von Jena bis Weimar (Tübingen, 1966).

3. The following are a few examples out of a rich literature. For religion, see Robert Liberles, Religious Conflict in Social Context; Meyer, Response to Modernity. For social and cultural changes, see Sorkin, Transformation of German Jewry, and Brenner, Renais sance of Jewish Culture. For Jewish political actions, see Schorsch, Jewish Reactions; Wertheimer, Unwelcome Strangers. For local and regional studies, see Shulamit Magnus, Jewish Emancipation in a German City: Cologne, 1798-1871 (Stanford, Calif., 1997); van Rahden, Breslauer; Schüler-Springorum, Königsberg; Baumann, Nachbarschaften. An excellent family history is Kraus, Mosse. For women's history, see Fassmann, Jüdinnen; Hertz, High Society; Kaplan, Making.

4. Henry Wassermann, "The Fliegende Blätter as a Source of the Social History of German Jewry," LBIYB 28 (1983), 96.

5. In Germany, this kind of history is known as Alltagsgeschichte, or the history of everyday life. Alltagsgeschichte connotes history from "below." In Britain this grew from labor history with Marxist influence and in the United States from non-Marxist sociology and the New Left. Although we have not done so in this volume, Alltagsgeschichte often focuses on microhistorical studies; for an excellent example, see David Sabean, Property, Production, and Family in Neckarhausen 1700-1870 (Cambridge, 1990) and his Kinship in Neckarhausen 1700-1870 (Cambridge, 1998).

6. Geoff Eley offers an analysis of how Alltagsgeschichte differs from social history in his "Labor History, Social History," 297-343 (especially 314-315, 340-343).

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