In Search of Democracy: The NAACP Writings of James Weldon Johnson, Walter White, and Roy Wilkins (1920-1977)

By Sondra Kathryn Wilson | Go to book overview

Jane White Viazzi remembers her father,
Walter White, in the following

Walter White was the father whom I lived with under the same roof for over twenty years of my life but whom I am still coming to know. Through my memories, through his writings, through the research and writings of others such as Sondra Kathryn Wilson, 43 years after his death he is still being revealed to me as extraordinary—for the exceptional breadth of his interests, for his energy and single-mindedness, for his vision of this country. I often wonder what he would make of today's world of black and white, whether the progress made would have given him some satisfaction. Yesterday's world certainly did not. Every injustice against black people made him angry and combative and, of course, still would where injustice still exists.

My father was more often away from home than in it. Countless were the valises my mother packed for him to travel thousands of miles on NAACP business (sometimes to his life's peril). He spent hours with his associates in meetings or on the telephone—a device he would have invented if it didn't already exist. He read and clipped from stacks of daily newspapers in order to keep abreast; we never read a paper that wasn't full of empty spots! He was frequently exhausted in the evenings, often short-tempered, sometimes discouraged, sometimes euphoric, always preoccupied and even obsessed with his assault on every form of American bigotry. Little did it all mean to my little brother and me; those years of overheard talk of cloture, filibuster, Senators Rankin and Bilbo, anti-lynching, disenfranchisement, the Scottsboro boys—all of this was the drumbeat against which our family life pulsated.

But even a selfish child must arrive at the lucid realization that her father is not an ordinary man, that he belongs to the world and she must hand him over. In truth, Walter White was only half alive in any other context than the NAACP and the civil rights struggle. He believed in both passionately, and he believed deeply in his own capacity to further them, which he did for 37 years. And yet today he is little celebrated. Perhaps Dr. Wilson's excellent work will remind us of his importance to the fight which paved the road to the Sixties and the present.

New York City Jane White Viazzi July 1, 1998

-vii-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
In Search of Democracy: The NAACP Writings of James Weldon Johnson, Walter White, and Roy Wilkins (1920-1977)
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 524

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.