Wielding the Dagger: The Marinekorps Flandern and the German War Effort, 1914-1918

By Mark D. Karau | Go to book overview

2
Building the Naval Bases and
Fortifying the Coast

The MarineKorps Flandern was initially created to give Germany a geographic advantage in a naval war with Great Britain by occupying the harbors along the Belgian and French coasts. Von Tirpitz intended to have it to construct naval bases along the coast that would aid the German navy in the prosecution of the war; in particular the Kleinkrieg, by which the Germans intended to whittle away at Britain's superiority in battleships with an aggressive campaign of minelaying and subsidiary operations by submarines. The Germans were particularly interested in the harbors along the northern French coast, especially Calais, but due to the setbacks in the west they were never able to reach them. As a result the MarineKorps concentrated its efforts on the Flanders harbors.

These harbors had a number of advantages over the main German fleet bases in the Helgoland Bight. The first and most obvious was simply their geographic position. The bases in the Helgoland Bight were roughly 450 nautical miles from the main British harbors on the west coast of England. The Flanders harbors, on the other hand, were only 250 nautical miles from those ports.1 The advantage is obvious. The closer German ships and submarines were to their area of operations, the less time they would have to spend in transit; therefore more time could be spent on station.

-23-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Wielding the Dagger: The Marinekorps Flandern and the German War Effort, 1914-1918
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Introduction 1
  • 1: The Creation of the Marinekorps 7
  • 2: Building the Naval Bases and Fortifying the Coast 23
  • 3: The Creation of the Flanders Flotillas 39
  • 4: The Year of Transition 63
  • 5: [Fall K] 107
  • 6: The Decisive Year 123
  • 7: Endgame 183
  • Conclusion 243
  • Appendix Tables 247
  • Bibliography 251
  • Index 259
  • About the Author 269
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 270

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.