Teaching Emergent Readers: Collaborative Library Lesson Plans

By Judy Sauerteig | Go to book overview
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The Boston Coffee Party

by Doreen Rappaport
Reading Level 2.7

Setting:Colonial Boston during the Revolutionary War
Characters:Mrs. Homans, Sarah Homans, Emma Homans, Merchant Thomas, and the women in the town
Plot:Greedy Merchant Thomas is warehousing coffee until there is none at the other merchants, and then he charges extremely high prices for his coffee.
Solution:The women of Boston teach Merchant Thomas a lesson using events similar to those of the historic Boston Tea Party.
Summary:During the Revolutionary War, times are hard in colonial Boston. Greedy Merchant Thomas is overcharging for sugar. Then he locks up all the coffee so he can overcharge for that, too! Young Sarah Homans wants to teach him a lesson. Merchant Thomas is about to attend a party he won't soon forget!
Curriculum Connections:Revolutionary War unit, patriotism, Fourth of July

ACTIVITIES FOR MEDIA SPECIALISTS

Schema

Ask the students if they know what caused the Revolutionary War. If they do not know anything about the war, then explain it briefly and talk about the Fourth of July.

Ask the students if they know of a time when something was expensive because it was very popular and many people wanted it—for example, a toy or game.


Predicting

Show students the picture and title on the cover. Ask: What do you think the girls are doing, and what does the title mean?

Ask students: Chapter 2 is called the [Sewing Party.] The women and girls are sewing two hundred shirts that are exactly alike. Who do you think might be wearing these shirts?


Library Skills

Who is the author of this book? Doreen Rappaport.

Is this a true story? Could it be true? (Point out the information at the end of the book.)

Discuss historical fiction.

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Teaching Emergent Readers: Collaborative Library Lesson Plans
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