Teaching Emergent Readers: Collaborative Library Lesson Plans

By Judy Sauerteig | Go to book overview

Crocodile and Hen:
A Bakongo Folktale

by Joan M. Lexau
Reading Level 2.2

Setting:The land along the Congo River where it meets the Atlantic Ocean.
Characters:Crocodile, Hen, and Lizard
Plot:Crocodile really wants to eat nice fat Hen, but she is not afraid of him and says they are brother and sister. This is extremely perplexing to Crocodile, and he seeks an answer.
Solution:Lizard explains that they have one thing in common that could make them brother and sister: both crocodiles and chickens lay eggs.
Summary:Hen goes down to the river to look for food, and there she meets Crocodile. Crocodile wants to eat Hen. Hen, however, stands her ground, looks at him strangely, calls him brother, and then walks away. The next day, Hen goes to the river again, and once again Crocodile wants to eat her. But Hen has so little fear that she simply closes her eyes and fluffs up her feathers; Crocodile shuts his mouth and swims away. He still does not understand how they could be brother and sister. On the third day, Hen goes again to the river. Crocodile is determined to eat her this time, but she just drinks the water. He can't bring himself to do it and decides to ask the Wise Old Woman about this. On his way to see her, Crocodile meets Lizard, who explains that hens, crocodiles, and lizards all lay eggs, and so they must be related. Crocodile really doesn't want to be Hen's brother because he would rather eat her, but from this time on, they are friends.
Curriculum Connections:Storytelling unit, Africa unit, folktales

ACTIVITIES FOR MEDIA SPECIALISTS

Schema

Ask the children what they know about Crocodiles. If there are any misconceptions, have a nonfiction book available to clarify misunderstandings.

Ask students if they have ever seen a crocodile. Explain the differences between alligators and crocodiles.


Predicting

Show students the cover of the book and have them predict what they think the story may be about.


Library Skills

Ask students how they would find more folktales in the library. Explain that there is a special area in the nonfiction section for folktales, fairy tales, tall tales, and legends from around the world.

-33-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Teaching Emergent Readers: Collaborative Library Lesson Plans
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 150

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.