Teaching Emergent Readers: Collaborative Library Lesson Plans

By Judy Sauerteig | Go to book overview

Five Silly Fisherman

by Roberta Edwards
Reading Level 1.5

Setting:Near a river in the country
Characters:Five fishermen
Plot:The five fishermen spend a nice day fishing at the river, but when it is time to go home, one of them seems to be missing.
Solution:It takes a little girl who has come to the lake to fish to straighten out a silly mistake the fishermen made.
Summary:The five fishermen go down to the river to fish. They each pick out their favorite spot and then warn the fish that they are going to catch them. At the end of the day, each fisherman has a nice, fat fish. When they get ready to leave, they decide to make sure everybody is safe and accounted for, but when they count heads, one fisherman is always missing, no matter who does the counting. A little girl figures out their problem and tricks them into giving her their fish by saying they must give them to her if she can find the missing fisherman. But she knows no one is really missing at all: each time one of the silly fishermen did the counting, he forgot to count himself!
Curriculum Connections:This is a good book to use with a math unit. There are five fishermen to start, but mental addition and subtraction can be practiced. For example, if two fishermen fall in the river, how many are left on the bank? One climbs out. Now how many are on the bank?

ACTIVITIES FOR MEDIA SPECIALISTS

Schema

Ask the students who has ever been fishing. Let them tell about their fishing experiences.


Predicting

Show the children the cover of the book. Have someone read the title. Ask what they think the title means, whether it is going to be a true story, and how they know.


Visualizing

Have children do the following exercise: Think of a place where you might go fishing. Make a picture in your mind. How many of you see a quiet place? How many see a noisy place? How many see a cold place? How many of you see a hot place? How many see yourselves on a boat? How many are on a river? A lake? An ocean?


Library Skills

On several fish-shaped cards, write names of places and things in the library. Using the game Go Fish, have the students fish for a card. When a student catches a fish, have him or her show the group what that word means in the library. The following words may be used:

computercheckout deskbook cover
picture booksmagazinesbookends
encyclopediasnonfiction bookvideos

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