Teaching Emergent Readers: Collaborative Library Lesson Plans

By Judy Sauerteig | Go to book overview

The Golly Sisters Go West

by Betsy Byars
Reading Level 2.1

Setting:On the trail heading out west
Characters:May-May and Rose Golly
Plot:The Golly sisters are heading west, and along the way they sing and dance to entertain people. They also fuss a great deal at each other. They still manage to have some interesting adventures and make the best of bad situations.
Solution:The Golly sisters finally figure out that they will get along better and not have so many troubles if they stop fussing at each other.
Summary:The Golly sisters are ready to go west, but the horse pulling the wagon just won't move. They finally remember that they must use [horse language,] such as giddy-up and whoa. In the second chapter, the sisters get ready to put on a show, but they start arguing about who should go first. By the time they settle the argument, the audience is gone. In the third chapter, the sisters get lost, so they start singing as the horse continues to pull the wagon. Then they hear people clapping and realize they have reached a town. The sisters even try to get their horse to act in a show but find out the horse cannot dance. They have to change their act in the fifth chapter, when a red hat is squashed because of their fighting. Finally, they decide to stop fussing.
Curriculum Connections:Westward Expansion unit, humorous stories unit

ACTIVITIES FOR MEDIA SPECIALISTS

Schema

Find out what the children already know about wagon trains and why people were willing to move out West. Show some pictures from nonfiction books with actual wagons and wagon trains.


Predicting

After presenting the title, ask the students if they think [Golly Sisters] is a real name. Show them the picture on the cover of the book. What kind of a story do they think this is going to be?


Visualizing

Measure off a space on the floor equivalent to what it would be like inside a wagon so students can feel how cramped it might have been. Have children do the following exercise: Picture yourself riding in a covered wagon. What would it be like? How much room would you have to sleep?


Library Skills

Ask the students how they might find more humorous books. What keywords could they use to find them in the catalog?

-45-

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