Teaching Emergent Readers: Collaborative Library Lesson Plans

By Judy Sauerteig | Go to book overview

Little Bear's Visit

by Else Holmelund Minarik
Reading Level 2.3

Setting:The home of Little Bear's Grandmother and Grandfather in the woods.
Characters:Little Bear, Grandmother Bear, Grandfather Bear, Mother Bear, and Father Bear
Plot:Little Bear is visiting Grandmother and Grandfather for the day, and his parents tell him not to make them too tired. They have a wonderful time telling stories and teasing each other. Grandfather Bear does have to take a little nap, but Little Bear refuses to admit he's tired. He tries very, very hard to stay awake until his parents come to pick him up, but it is very difficult.
Solution:Little Bear falls asleep while Grandfather Bear is still teasing him about how they never get tired when they are having so much fun.
Summary:In this chapter book, Little Bear visits his Grandmother and Grandfather. Little Bear loves to visit and see all the fun things in Grandmother and Grandfather's house. Little Bear loves to hear stories, and because Grandfather fell asleep in his chair, he begs Grandmother to tell him the story of his mother and the robin. Chapter Two is the story of how Mother Bear took in a little robin who could not find his nest, but eventually the robin becomes sad, and she lets him go free. Chapter Three is a story that Grandfather tells about a goblin that is frightened right out of his shoes. In Chapter Four, Little Bear insists that he is not tired, but he falls asleep before Mother Bear and Father Bear even leave Grandparents' house.

ACTIVITIES FOR MEDIA SPECIALISTS

Schema

Ask the children to talk about some of their experiences with their grandparents.


Predicting

Read the titles of each of the chapters. Ask the children what they think the chapters are going to be about.


Visualizing

Have the children picture in their mind a fun time they have had with their grandparents.


Library Skills

Tell the students that the pictures in this book were done by Maurice Sendak, a famous il-
lustrator. Ask: What does the word illustrator mean?

-65-

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