The Inventive Mind in Science: Creative Thinking Activities

By Christine Ebert; Edward S. Ebert | Go to book overview

Introduction

We are surrounded; they are everywhere. In fact, we are virtually inundated with them. Take a look around, inventions are all over the place! Inventing, whether products or ideas, represents human capability at its best. The creative aspect of our thinking underlies science, problem solving, and technological progress. There is nothing secret here; it is not reserved for people with some special talent. We are all creative thinkers. With this book you and your students can develop and enhance creative abilities, become a part of the exciting and creative world of inventing in the classroom, and use a creative problem-solving theme to teach across the curricula.

By and large, the grade school maxim has been that there are two ways new things come into being: invention or discovery. Everything falls into one of these categories. For the most part, that is about as far as it goes. Sometimes examples of roles in the process might be suggested, for instance that scientists and explorers deal with discoveries, while engineers invent. Actually, the connection between discovery and invention is much closer than the traditional example suggests. It is possible to suggest an explanation of how we think, that does not separate the processes of discovering or searching and inventing. These processes are the way that people, your students as well, naturally go about the business of thinking.

Discovery and invention are not the particular jobs of certain occupations. In fact, Paul Winchell, the famous puppeteer, holds one of the first patents issued for an artificial heart. Do we consider him a scientist, an inventor, or a puppeteer? Thomas Edison, a person widely associated with the term inventor, created much of the technology that facilitated the use of his inventions as well. Should he be classified as a scientist or engineer? More to the point, there might be an attribute of our thinking ability that is common to all of the activities and roles mentioned. That common attribute is creative thinking.

Science curricula provide the classroom teacher at any grade level with an excellent opportunity to teach content and develop creative problem-solving ability through discovery and invention. While discovery is the activity in which scientists are engaged, inventing is also a logical, if not natural, extension of scientific investigation. The inventive process makes any discovery valuable in a practical sense. And practical value is the foundry in which progress is forged.

Linking investigative and inventive approaches in education allows students to apply their practical knowledge in an inventive way to solve problems. Nearly sixty years ago, John Dewey offered educators the idea that genuine thinking begins with a problematic situation, and that creative intelligence is fostered by solving authentic problems.

-xi-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Inventive Mind in Science: Creative Thinking Activities
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 244

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.