Hip Hop and Philosophy: Rhyme 2 Reason

By Derrick Darby; Tommie Shelby | Go to book overview

The Hip-Hop Head Index
Adorno, Theodor W., xii
aesthetics, black, 108–110; dance, 207; hip-hop, 108, 111; pragmatist, 57; rap, 54, 57; violence, 59–62
Africa, 50, 69, 171, 176, 193; adolescents in, 105
African Americans, economic potential of, 62; female, 137; harmed by epithets, 147–48; justice for, 171; male, 65, 97; and political revolution, 182; previous generations of, 172; and race (racial injustice), 177–181, 202; as segregated and ostracized, 190–91; social contract with U.S. government and, 163; struggles for civil rights and, 162, 164, 166, 186; in urban areas, 169; young, 147
African People's Socialist Party, 67
Afrocentrism, 83, 113, 172, 176–78, 182
“Ain't No Mystery” (Brand Nubian), 13
“Ain't Nothing Like the Real Thing” (Gaye and Terrell), 211
“Ain't the Devil Happy?” (Jeru the Damaja), 63
Alaska, and legality of weed, 6
Alcibiades, 22–25
alienation, 83; in labor, 71
All Eyez on Me (2Pac), 93
AmeriKKKa's Most Wanted (Ice Cube), 52 Amsterdam, and legality ol weed, 6, 9
Andre 3000, 15, 17, 24, 47
“Apache” (Incredible Bongo Band), xiv
Aquinas, St. Thomas, xv, 5, 7–11; Siimma Tbeologica, 7–8, 11
Aristophanes, xi, 17–20
Aristotle, xii, 55, 57, 194; Nicomachean Ethics, 194
Ashanti, 112
Ashford, Nickolas, 18, 211
Asia, 50, 105
Athens, xiii, xiv, 14
Austin, J.L., 139–140; How to Do Things with Words, 139
authenticity, xv, 45, 93, 99, 122–23, 130, 141; black, 105–06; cultural, 83–84, 105; and performativity, 103–04
authoritarianism, xii
autonomy, 163–64. See also freedom
“AWOL” (Paris), 157
“Baby Got Back” (Sir Mix-A-Lot), 134
“Back Stabbers” (O'Jays), 114
Badu, Erykah, 113
Bakhtin, Mikhail, 211

-223-

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