Economic Development: Past and Present

By Richard T. Gill | Go to book overview
is likely to remain an imperative for decades to come. To be effective, moreover, aid must be looked at not as just a temporary stop-gap but as a long-run commitment. Even with such aid, many of these countries face a long battle against difficult odds; without it, they would have reason to despair. This is not to say that desperate men do not have alternatives. China, with much less aid, has been able to expand her industrial capacity beyond that of India, and, if she weathers the current storm, may conceivably continue to widen the gap in the future. It is simply to say that it would be a deep human tragedy if, through a lack of vision or compassion in the advanced countries, the poor nations of the world were to decide that the insupportable costs of China's way would have to be supported after all.Selected Readings
Ashton T. S., The Industrial Revolution. ( London: Home University Library of Modern Knowledge, 1948.) A brief but broadly conceived account of the English Industrial Revolution of the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries.
Government of India Planning Commission. This Commission publishes many documents including the Indian Five Year Plans, a reading of which will bring home to the student the concrete problems faced by the underdeveloped nations as they attempt to achieve economic growth.
Harris S. E. (ed.), American Economic History. ( New York: McGraw-Hill, 1961.) A collection of fifteen essays written by twenty experts on various aspects of American economic growth; although the work lacks the chronological unity of a general economic history text, it provides interesting discussions of many particular problems.
Higgins Benjamin, Economic Development. ( New York: Norton, 1959.) An intermediate and comprehensive (800-page) textbook on economic development which includes a treatment of the major theories of economic growth and a long discussion of the many policy issues facing modern underdeveloped countries.
Hirschman Albert O., The Strategy of Economic Development. ( New Haven: Yale University Press, 1958.) The case for "unbalanced" growth is presented here as are many other stimulating insights into the problems of underdeveloped countries.
Kuznets Simon, Six Lectures on Economic Growth. ( Glencoe, Ill.: The Free Press, 1959.) One of the numerous books and articles by a distinguished scholar of growth trends in both advanced and underdeveloped countries; these lectures touch on such topics as the measurement of economic growth, the rapidity of growth in different countries, rates of capital formation, and changes in the quantitative importance of the different sectors of growing economies.
Lockwood W. W., The Economic Development of Japan: Growth and Structural Change, 1869- 1938. ( Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1954.) A splendid historical analysis of the growth of the modern Japanese economy.
Nurske Ragnar, Problems of Capital Formation in Underdeveloped Areas. ( New York: Oxford University Press, 1953.) A seminal work in the development field emphasizing such concepts as vicious circles of poverty, balanced growth, and disguised unemployment.
Pirenne Henri, Economic and Social History of Medieval Europe. ( New York: Harcourt, Brace, 1956.) A brilliant summary account of economic changes in Europe in the Middle Ages with special attention to the growth of commerce and urban life.
Schumpeter J. A., The Theory of Economic Development. ( Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1949.) A classic work, published originally in German in 1911, in which the late Professor Schumpeter develops the concept of entrepreneurship and its key role in economic growth.

-116-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Economic Development: Past and Present
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 120

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.