SLAVIC PANTHEON
Divinities in the mythology and
demonology of the Early Slavs

SUPERIOR DEITIES
A. FATHER OF THE GODS SVAROG—the primeval, uncreated and eternal deitydemiurge, All-father, as well as the personification of the sustaining principle, his name being cognate with the Sanskrit svar, 'bright clear or shining'; the artificer of the world who has withdrawn from outer activity
B. SVAROZHICH (Svarogich)—the supreme elemental god and Svarog's son, who was believed to preside over all the gods
C. Other supreme native divinities—GODS
PERUN (Pyerun)—god of thunder and lightning, also of war and agriculture; his Norse and Teutonic counterpart is Thor(r), also known as Donar; Thursday is named after him while Wednesday comes from Odin's name (Thor's divine father), also spelled 'Woden'
RADEGAST (Radhost)—a god of evening stars, fires and star light; presumably just an aspect of Svantovit
DAZHBOG—a sky-deity, the god of light and fire, the giver of warmth, Svarog's son; believed to rule over the twelve kingdoms of the Zodiac, served by the two Auroras (Zorya, Zvezda)
SVANTOVIT (Sventovit)—the principal deity of the Slavonic Balts; god of gods; the god of husbandmen, prophesy and war; father of the Sun and fire; a white stallion, sacred to Svantovit and a means of divination, was kept in his chief temple at Arkona
D. Other higher divinities—GODS
VELES (Plentiful)—the god of the underworld and harvest, also the patron god of farm cattle
STRIBOG (Striborg)—the god of space, air and wind
ROD (One Who Promotes Birth)—once a universal god, he was toppled from his position by Perun to be worshipped as a male deity of primeval fertility; protector of the home
SIM & RYGL—twin deities, see SIMARGL

-154-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Slavic Myths
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 166

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.