Folktales of the Jews - Vol. 2

By Dan Ben-Amos | Go to book overview

5
The Demons and Spirits
under the Fingernails

TOLD BY AVIGDOR REEDER

In the village of Wiela̧cza, which lies between Szczebrzeszyn and Zamosc, there lived a village Jew, a simple, hardworking, and God-fearing man. Like all village Jews, he did not sin by knowing too much Torah. When they first met him, people quickly sensed a Jew who smelled of the field and stable. He spoke with three R's—r-r-r—which sharply marked him off from the city language. In the morning, he put on his tallit*and tefillin** and spent a long time saying "Mah Tovu"—the verse recited when you enter the synagogue§—because he hardly knew Hebrew. The man supported himself by dealing in pig bristles, a rough commodity and, more important, one that involves animals. In fact, people called him "the animal dealer."

He had four daughters and one son. The son, as should be, was his magic ring: The man wanted his son to ensure his own portion in the world to come, too. He had him study with a teacher from Szczebrzeszyn, so he would learn what a Jew should know: to pray a little and say Kaddish,§§ after 120 years,*** for his father and to write a little Yiddish.

The village Jew took his son, Yoshke, to all the fairs to teach him to earn his own bread. Yoshke took to his apprenticeship in business well. He soon was expert at touching an animal and reckoning how much it was worth. He was more successful at business than at learning Torah.

One fine Friday, Yoshke came home to get himself ready for the Sabbath Queen. He bathed in the brook in honor of the Sabbath, cleaned his Sabbath boots and smeared them with grease, and trimmed his nails—

*Prayer shawl.

**Small black leather prayers boxes, wrapped around the head and arm, containing passages from the
Torah.

§See Numbers 24:5.

§§The mourner's prayer.

***That is, after the father has lived a full life (see Genesis 6:3).

-33-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Folktales of the Jews - Vol. 2
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 624

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.