Folktales of the Jews - Vol. 2

By Dan Ben-Amos | Go to book overview

16
The Karliner Rebbe's Prescription

TOLD BY YA'AKOV RABINOVITZ
TO YOḤANAN BEN-ZAKKAI

As.a.shepherd.tends his flock, so did the "Babe of Stolin" care for his flock and see to all their bodily and spiritual needs. Nevertheless, he also conducted conversations on secular matters: with one person he would discuss philosophy and ethics; for another he would write down a "prescription"—a charm for physical health.

A Hasid who felt unwell would come to the rebbe,* describe his ailments, and ask for a remedy. The rebbe would ask questions and make inquiries, arrive at a diagnosis, and write out a tried and true prescription for perfect health.

Once, during the intermediate days of Passover, a brawny Jew came to the rebbe with a request: "Rebbe, I am a carter, a man of the whip and harness. I travel the roads and work day and night. In summer I'm consumed by the heat, and in winter I'm seared by the cold. But my strength is failing—may it not happen to you—and I get dizzy when I'm on the road. Would the rebbe be so kind and merciful as to write me a prescription to ease my ailments?"

The rebbe tore a piece of paper from his notebook, wrote down some words in Polish, and gave it to the Hasid. "Here is your prescription," he told him, "a proven charm against headache. Now go in peace, and with God's help you will be well."

The Jew took a respectful leave of the rebbe and went his way.

Summer passed, autumn arrived, and during one of the Ten Days of Penitence the same Jew came to the rebbe again. His face made it plain that he was in great pain. The rebbe recognized him. "What's the problem, whip master?" he asked. "Why do you look so downcast?"

"Rebbe, the headaches have come back. Please, have mercy on me and write me a note, and my pains will be relieved again."

*A Hasidic rabbi.

-118-

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