Folktales of the Jews - Vol. 2

By Dan Ben-Amos | Go to book overview

33
With the Rebbe's Power

TOLD BY TONY SALOMON-MA'ARAVI

In our town, the Hasidim used to beam with joy whenever anyone returned from a long journey and brought back with him some miracle worked by the rebbe's* power.

One day the worshipers in the tailors' synagogue found out that a young man from Dorohoi had been suggested as a match for Reb** Henokh Stoller's daughter, Idislen. Because Reb Henokh had relatives and lots of acquaintances in that town, he went to Dorohoi to learn something about the proposed match.

Of course, he set out on a lucky day—a Tuesday. And because he left us on a Tuesday, he would arrive on Thursday, so that on Friday, when people come to the synagogue early to pray, he would be sure to learn something.

And that's just how it was. His relatives and acquaintances received him warmly. They all gave him helpful information and advised him that on the Sabbath he should pray at the rebbe's, kloyz.§ They would send the synagogue wardens a note asking that he be admitted to the rebbe right after Havdalah.§§ He should tell the great rabbi about the match that had been proposed for his young daughter.

When Reb Henokh came to the kloyz, the wardens greeted him: "Where are you from? What request do you want to make of our great tzadik?"*** Smiling, the chief warden told him, "Our rebbe, may he have a long life, is truly an emissary of God. Listen what a miraculous event occurred because of him:

"Here in the town we had a Jew, a tailor, a truly pious man. But he had three grown daughters and, what is more, was as poor as the night. And

*A Hasidic rabbi.

**Rabbi or Mr.

§Hasidic house of prayer.

§§Ceremony that marks the end of the Sabbath.

***Great scholar or holy person.

-250-

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