Folktales of the Jews - Vol. 2

By Dan Ben-Amos | Go to book overview

51
The Poor Man Who Became Rich

TOLD BY WOLF SOSENSKI TO DINAH BEHAR

A man who was working in the field found a treasure. He took it home and became rich. He moved to a different place, purchased a fine large house, and educated and raised his three children. Eventually he sent them to the big city to learn a profession.

The first became a rabbi. The second studied medicine and became a physician. The third studied music and became a great performing artist. They studied for a number of years, until they grew up, married, and built their own homes.

One day, the mother said, "What do we have from our children? We gave them an education and every fine thing, but now we don't see them. Let's go see how they are."

They took some money and went to visit their sons. The first son, who was a rabbi, greeted them warmly and respectfully and brought them to the school, where his disciples sat immersed in their studies and everyone else, too, was engaged in prayer and Torah study. It was as if the whole world were pious and observant.

As for the second, the physician, they came to him and saw how he cared for his patients in the hospital, a place where everyone lay, dressed in white, moaning and suffering. They watched surgical operations and even saw how people die. Their son the physician showed them everything—it seemed as if the whole world were sick. After they saw how they performed surgery, they "the couple" could not stay any longer and went to visit their third son, the musician.

He took them to the theater, which was brightly lit, sat them in the best seats in the house, and asked them to wait until he came to collect them after everyone had left.

Cheerful music resounded through the hall, the atmosphere was happy, and there was dancing and singing on stage. That is how the performance began. Then a man with a patriarchal visage and long white beard came on stage. When the play was over they waited for their son to come collect them.

-372-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Folktales of the Jews - Vol. 2
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 624

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.