Case Study Research in Educational Settings

By Michael Bassey | Go to book overview

2 An example of a theory-seeking
case study leading to fuzzy
propositions
It may be helpful to the reader at this early stage of the book to see an example of the kind of case study which can lead to fuzzy generalization. The following case report is based on an article by Dr Chris Holligan published in the British Educational Research Journal, 23(4), 533–50 (1997) and entitled 'Theory in initial teacher education: students' perspectives on its utility-a case study'. This version is abbreviated and rewritten to illustrate the concept of educational case study leading to fuzzy generalization as developed in this book; it is used with his kind permission. The report is followed by an 'audit certificate', which is an idea introduced in Chapter 7, and a checklist which checks whether the report meets the criteria of an educational case study, which are discussed in Chapter 6.Theory in initial teacher education: some BEd students' perspectives on its utility in 1996 (Chris Holligan,1 Open University)
Abstract
The evidence of this enquiry, arising from a study of 40 BEd students at Paisley University in 1996, and insofar as the teaching of Education Studies and grading procedures in other places can be related to those of the study, supports these two fuzzy propositions:
BEd students are likely to perceive Education Studies as facilitating their teaching competence;
BEd students who are graded as better teachers are likely to perceive more value in Education Studies than less able students.

The prime data source was two-hour semi-structured interviews with the students.

-14-

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