Guilty Pleas in International Criminal Law: Constructing a Restorative Justice Approach

By Nancy Amoury Combs | Go to book overview

CHAPTER THREE
Do the Numbers Count?
The Ends Served by International Criminal Prosecutions
in Societies Emerging from Mass Atrocities

The Nuremberg and Tokyo tribunals were expected to usher in an era of accountability for international crimes, but although the fifty years that elapsed after the creation of those tribunals saw many thousands of international crimes, virtually no criminal prosecutions took place. The importance of the ICTY’s creation in 1993, then, cannot be overestimated; a veritable revolution in attitudes regarding the need for criminal accountability following mass atrocities has been wrought in little more than a decade. However, as Chapter 2 demonstrated, the “criminal accountability” currently being sought is being sought from only a small proportion of offenders. Prosecutions of international crimes are said to advance a variety of penological goals, including retribution, deterrence, incapacitation, and rehabilitation. Prosecutions are further said to promote other ends of value specifically to societies recently torn by large-scale violence, such as encouraging acceptance of the rule of law, minimizing the likelihood of collective blame, and creating an accurate historical record. Whether the prosecution of international crimes advances any or all of these goals has lately been subject to question, but assuming for the sake of argument that they do, then the question arises as to whether these goals are advanced when prosecutions are limited to a small number of (usually) high-level offenders. The following discussion suggests that, although in many cases the ends served by international prosecutions are nominally the same as the ends served by the prosecution of domestic crimes, in fact, these goals take on different contours in the context of large-scale violence—differences that indicate an especially compelling need for a substantial number of prosecutions. The discussion further reveals that undertaking a substantial number of

-45-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Guilty Pleas in International Criminal Law: Constructing a Restorative Justice Approach
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 372

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.