Putting Voters in Their Place: Geography and Elections in Great Britain

By Ron Johnston; Charles Pattie | Go to book overview

APPENDIX: THE BRITISH ELECTION STUDY

Political Knowledge
Political knowledge was assessed using responses to the following true/false statements:
The number of MPs in the House of Commons is about 100. (false)
The longest time permitted between general elections is four years. (false)
Great Britain's electoral system uses proportional representation. (false)
MPs from different parties sit on parliamentary committees. (true)
No individual can be on the electoral roll in two different places. (false).
Great Britain holds different elections for the Euro and British parliaments. (true)
Women are not allowed to sit in the House of Lords. (false)
The Queen appoints the British prime minister. (true)
No one is allowed to stand for Parliament unless they pay a deposit. (true)
A Minister of State is senior to a Secretary of State. (false)

Political Attitudes
The following questions were used to assess political attitudes:
Do you think Britain should continue to be a member of the European Community or should it withdraw?
On the whole, do you think Britain's interests are better served by closer links with Western Europe or closer links with America?
Do you think Britain's long-term policy should be to leave the European Community, to stay in the EC and try and reduce its powers, to leave things as they are, to stay in the EC and try to increase its powers, or to work for the formation of a single European government?
Here are three statements about the future of the pound in the EC. Which one comes closest to your view?
Replace the pound by a single currency.
Use both the pound and a new European currency in Britain.
Keep the pound as the only currency for Britain.
(agree/disagree) If we stay in the EC, Britain will lose control over decisions that affect Britain.
(agree/disagree) The competition from other EC countries is making Britain more modern and efficient.
(agree/disagree) Lots of good British traditions will have to be given up if we stay in the EC.
Government (definitely should/shouldn't) get rid of private education in Britain.
Government (definitely should/shouldn't) spend more money to get rid of poverty.

-304-

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Putting Voters in Their Place: Geography and Elections in Great Britain
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Editors' Preface v
  • Preface vii
  • Contents ix
  • List of Figures xi
  • List of Tables xiii
  • List of Abbreviations xix
  • 1: Models of Voting 1
  • 2: Bringing Geography In 40
  • 3: The Geography of Voting 63
  • 4: Talking Together and Voting Together 106
  • 5: The Local Economy and the Local Voter 144
  • 6: Party Campaigns and Their Impact 187
  • 7: To Vote or Not to Vote 227
  • 8: Votes into Seats 266
  • Appendix - The British Election Study 304
  • References 307
  • Index 335
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