Leaving the M/Other: Whitman, Kristeva, and Leaves of Grass

By Beth Jensen | Go to book overview

Notes

INTRODUCTION: WHITMAN'S [MOTHER]

1. Walt Whitman, Leaves of Grass: A Textual Variorum of the Printed Poems, ed. Sculley Bradley and Harold W. Blodgett (New York: New York University Press, 1980), 1:448–53. All quotations from Leaves of Grass are from Leaves of Grass: A Textual Variorum of the Printed Poems, vols. 1–3, unless otherwise noted. Poems originally published in 1855 and 1856 appear in vol. 1 of the variorum edition; 1860 and 1867, in vol. 2; and 1871 and 1876, in vol. 3. Line numbers for quotations from Leaves of Grass are cited in the text. No citation appears when lines are sufficiently identified, as by the titles of short poems or sections of longer poems.

2. In 1855, the poems were not titled. Throughout the text, I will use titles from the deathbed edition. I will quote lines, however, from the original editions. The ellipses other than those indicating full line omission for poems first published in 1855 are original to the 1855 edition.

3. Walt Whitman, Leaves of Grass: A Textual Variorum of the Printed Poems, ed. Sculley Bradley and Harold W. Blodgett (New York: New York University Press, 1980), 2:51–54; 57–63.

4. In 1865, Whitman published a collection of poems entitled Drum-Taps. Between 1865 and 1866, he added an additional twenty-four pages, entitled Se- quel: When Lilacs Last in the Door-Yard Bloom'd and Other Poems. Both works were annexed into the 1867 edition of Leaves of Grass. Even though most of the poems in Drum-Taps were written and published in 1865, I will refer to them as part of the 1867 edition.

5. Walt Whitman, Leaves of Grass: A Textual Variorum of the Printed Poems, ed. Sculley Bradley and Harold W. Blodgett (New York: New York University Press, 1980), 2:143–45; 149–50.

6. Walt Whitman, Leaves of Grass: A Textual Variorum of the Printed Poems, ed. Sculley Bradley and Harold W. Blodgett (New York: New York University Press, 1980), 3:190–93.

7. I will refer to the persona Whitman creates in his poetry as either [the poet] or the [the speaker.] The use of the term [speaker] does not refer to the entity's state of development.

8. The changes I trace in maternal presence correspond with the documented movement in Leaves of Grass from the concrete/physical to the abstract/spiritual. Throughout the book, I acknowledge Roger Asselineau as one of the first to detail the textual differences, even though this overall movement is widely accepted today in Whitman scholarship. (See Killingsworth's The

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Leaving the M/Other: Whitman, Kristeva, and Leaves of Grass
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 3
  • Contents 7
  • Acknowledgments 9
  • Introduction - Whitman's [Mother] 13
  • 1: 1855 and 1856 Editions: Blissful Union 30
  • 2: 1860 Edition: Ambivalent Struggle 55
  • 3: 1867 Edition: Mater Dolorosa 80
  • 4: 1871 and 1876 Editions: the Symbolic 99
  • Notes 112
  • Bibliography 128
  • Index 132
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