Essays on the Nobility of Medieval Scotland

By K. J. Stringer | Go to book overview

APPENDIX II
TWO HITHERTO UNPUBLISHED CHARTERS OF
JAMES THE STEWART

In editing these two charters, the use of u, v, i and j has been rationalised; otherwise the spelling and punctuation of the original charter have been retained, while the punctuation of the copy is editorial. The copyist has generally used the æ diphthong in words such as praesentes, but not invariably and never in heres. In all such cases, e is printed in our text.


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James, Stewart of Scotland, grants heritably to Thomas called Brewster, for homage and service, all that land beside Paisley called Saucerland, by marches specified, with pasture for four cows with two calves not more than one year old within donor's park of Blackhall, with free ish and entry by one gate to be made at the side of the park adjoining Saucerland; with liberty to have brewhouses, abattoir, mill and tannery, with facilities to carry on trade, and with use of the Water of Cart saving the rights of the monks of Paisley; also grants pasture for twelve oxen and cows within common pasture of Raise, with liberty to make shielings; penalty for twelve beasts straying in donor's forest one penny; penalty for beasts straying in park of Blackhall two pence. Thomas and his men may have timber from growing wood under supervision of donor's forester, and firewood; also right to dig and dry peats in donor's peatmoss of Thornly. Also grants maximum fines of three shillings in donor's court of the barony of Renfrew, and that goods seized shall be paid for, before being seized, at reasonable market price. Performing forinsec service of one bowman for one day a year at donor's castle of Renfrew, if reasonably forewarned; rendering at Blackhall one penny yearly at Whitsun in name of feu-ferme. (c. 1294 × 1295 [all the witnesses also witness the Stewart's principal charter for Paisley abbey, 9 January 1295]).

Sciant presentes et futuri quod nos Jacobus senescallus Scotie dedimus et concessimus et hac presenti carta nostra confirmavimus Thome dicto braciatori et heredibus suis, pro homagio et servitio suo, totam1 illam terram iuxta Passeleth que vocatur Sauserland, per has divisas: incipiendo de parco nostro Nigre Aule, descendendo per rivulum de Espedare usque ad rupem que est divisa monachorum de Passeleth, et per illam rupem ex transverso usque ad in aquam de Kerth', et sic per illam aquam de Kerth ascendendo usque ad quoddam fossatum quod est prope ianuam dicti parci nostri, et sic per latus eiusdem parci sicut tempore huius donationis nostre stetit, usque ad rivulum de Espedare predictum. Dedimus etiam et concessimus predicto Thome et heredibus suis pasturam ad quatuor vaccas, cum duobus vitulis dummodo de etate unius anni extiterint, infra parcum nostrum de

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