Essays on the Nobility of Medieval Scotland

By K. J. Stringer | Go to book overview

APPENDIX

The purpose of this Appendix is to provide lists of those families below the rank of earl who have been considered for the purposes of this chapter as belonging to the Scottish higher nobility between 1325 and 1500. The families are listed first under each of the generations in which they were prominent and, secondly, alphabetically. Specific references have not been cited for families which are the subjects of individual articles in the Scots Peerage.


A. List of families by 25-year generations.
1325–1349

Abernethy, Ardrossan, Cameron of Baledgarno, Campbell of Loudon, Cheyne, Douglas, Fenton, Fraser of Touch, Graham of Abercorn, Graham of Lovat, Graham of Montrose, Hay, Keith, Leslie, Lindsay of Crawford, Maxwell, Menteith, Mowat, Murray of Culbin, Muschet, Oliphant, Ramsay of Dalhousie, Seton, Sinclair, Stewart, Straiton, Wemyss (derived from the Declaration of Arbroath: APS, i, pp. 474–5); plus Boyd, Bruce of Liddesdale, Campbell, Fleming, Gordon, Hamilton, Lauder, Macdonald, Macruarie, Menzies, Murray of Bothwell (also prominent in the 1320s: see above, at notes 23–5); plus Barclay of Brechin, Douglas of Liddesdale, Keith (II) (families prominent in the 1340s).

(The families of Brechin, Mowbray, Soules and Umfraville, all named in the Declaration of Arbroath, have been omitted from the analysis because they did not form part of the Scottish higher nobility in 1325.)

Extinctions: Ardrossan, Bruce of Liddesdale, Cheyne, Fraser of Touch, Graham of Abercorn, Keith, Macruarie, Muschet, Seton, Wemyss.

Promoted to earl: Fleming (Wigtown).

No longer prominent by 1349: Cameron of Baledgarno, Campbell of Loudon, Fenton, Graham of Lovat, Lauder, Menzies, Mowat, Murray of Culbin, Straiton.


1350–1374

Annan, Bisset, Campbell, Cunningham, Dalziel, Danielston, Dishington, Douglas, Douglas of Dalkeith, Douglas of Galloway, Eglinton, Erskine, Fleming of Cumbernauld, Graham of Montrose, Gray, Haliburton, Hamilton, Hay of Yester, Keith (II), Kennedy, Kirkpatrick, Leslie of Ross, Lindsay of Crawford, Lindsay of Glenesk, Livingston, Macdonald, Macdougall, Maxwell, Mortimer, Mure of Abercorn, Murray of Bothwell, Ramsay of Colluthie, Ramsay of Dalhousie, Somerville, Stewart, Stewart of Darnley, Strachan, Vaus, Wallace, Wemyss of Cameron (derived from the list of David II's hostages agreed in 1357 and the membership of parliamentary committees in the 1360s: RRS, vi, no. 150; APS, i, pp. 495, 497, 501, 506, 508); plus Abernethy, Barclay of Brechin, Boyd, Douglas of Liddesdale, Drummond, Gordon, Hay, Leslie, Logie, Menteith, Oliphant, Preston, Seton (II), Sinclair, Stewart of Badenoch (families which may reasonably be considered prominent during part or all of this generation). (The families of John Barclay and Andrew Valence, who were both listed among David II's hostages, have been omitted because their genealogical details are unclear.)

Extinctions: Barclay of Brechin, Bisset, Douglas of Liddesdale, Macdougall, Menteith, Murray of Bothwell, Vaus, Wallace.

Promoted to earl: Douglas (Douglas), Ramsay of Colluthie (Fife), Stewart (Strathearn).

No longer prominent by 1374: Annan, Dalziel, Dishington, Kirkpatrick, Logie, Preston, Strachan, Wemyss of Cameron.

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