Charles Sanders Peirce: Contributions to "The Nation" - Vol. 3

By Kenneth Laine Ketner; James Edward Cook | Go to book overview

OBITUARIES OF CHARLES SANDERS PEIRCE
FROM THE NATION
1914

98 (23 April 1914) 473
NOTES

CHARLES S. S. PEIRCE, logician, mathematician, and philosopher, who died on April 20, was born in Cambridge, Mass., on September 10, 1839, the son of Prof. Benjamin Peirce, the foremost American mathematician of his time. His mother was the daughter of United States Senator Mills, of Massachusetts. He was graduated from Harvard in 1859. He was connected with the United States Coast and Geodetic Survey for a number of years, and for several years was lecturer on logic in Johns Hopkins University. It was in this subject that his most original work was done, his papers on the algebra of logic and on the logic of relatives being pioneer work, and giving him an international reputation. His most conspicuous contribution to the philosophical thought of the time was the idea of pragmatism, afterwards developed and modified by William James. In 1887 he retired to Pike County, Pa., to devote himself completely to logic. His only companion was his wife, who, before her marriage, was Juliette Froissy. Mr. Peirce was a member of the National Academy of Sciences, and a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He was the author of "Photometric Researches," and of numerous articles upon logic, history of science, metaphysics, psychology, mathematics, gravitation, astronomy, map projections, color-sense, chemistry and the cataloguing of libraries. He contributed a large part of the scientific definitions to the Century Dictionary and some of the chief articles on logic to Baldwin's Dictionary of Psychology and Philosophy. During many years, Mr. Peirce was a highly valued contributor to the Nation, his reviews of mathematical and other scientific works being of unusual interest and brilliancy.


98 (30 April 1914) 489-490.THE LONELY HEIGHTS OF SCIENCE

Haskell (Index to The Nation) cites Fabian Franklin as the author of this obituary of Hill and Peirce. Franklin studied with Peirce at The Johns Hopkins University.

Looking under the name "Hill," in the Encyclopaedia Britannica, we find "Hill, Ambrose Powell, American Confederate soldier," "Hill, Daniel Harvey, American Confederate soldier," "Hill, David Bennett, American politician," and other Hills, American and English, but not Hill, George William, American astronomer. Nor did the death of George William Hill, a few days ago, evoke from the American newspaper press anything more than perfunctory notice. Yet he was one of the extremely small group of men in this country whose scientific work was of the highest order. His researches in celestial mechanics will rank permanently

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