Capital Punishment and Latino Offenders: Racial and Ethnic Differences in Death Sentences

By Martin G. Urbina | Go to book overview

PREFACE

A review of the existing literature on death sentence outcomes (i.e., executions, commutations) shows evidence of differential treatment against minority defendants (e.g., African Americans). However, in large part because data on Latinos is either non-existent or extremely difficult to locate, there is not much on the Latino experience. Most prior studies have followed an African American/Caucasian and/or commutation/execution approach. Latino defendants have either been excluded or treated as a monolithic group. Thus, little is known about death sentence outcomes for Latinos, whose experiences differ from those of African Americans and Caucasians. Additionally, little is known about the treatment of the various ethnic groups (e.g., Cubans, Mexicans) that constitute the largest minority group in the United States, Latinos. Additionally, since the focus has been on executions and/or commutations, there is not much about other possible death sentence outcomes: sentence declared unconstitutional, sentence overturned, and conviction overturned.

Therefore, the main objective of this study is to go beyond traditional approaches and to address these shortcomings empirically by analyzing death sentence outcomes data for California, Florida, and Texas between 1975 and 1995. In addition, this study will explore the effects of legal variables in death sentencing as well as race and ethnicity.

-xi-

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Capital Punishment and Latino Offenders: Racial and Ethnic Differences in Death Sentences
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Criminal Justice - Recent Scholarship i
  • Title Page iii
  • Dedication v
  • Table of Contents vii
  • List of Tables ix
  • Preface xi
  • Acknowledgments xiii
  • Chapter1 - Introduction 1
  • Chapter 2 - Theories of Race and Ethnic Differences in Punishment and Sentencing 9
  • Chapter3 - Death Sentencing and Death Sentence Outcomes: Review of Prior Empirical Studies 41
  • Chapter 4 - History of U.S. Race and Ethnic Relations 93
  • Chapter 5 - The Present Study 153
  • Chapter 6 - Latinos Executed in the United States Between 1975 and 1995 181
  • Chapter 7 - Findings 195
  • Chapter 8 - Conclusion 229
  • Appendix 239
  • Endnotes 243
  • References 257
  • Index 277
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