The Origins of Postcommunist Elites: From Prague Spring to the Breakup of Czechoslovakia

By Gil Eyal | Go to book overview

Notes

Introduction

1. R. S. Milne, Politics in Ethnically Bipolar States (Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, 1981).

2. Martin Bútora and Zora Bútrova, "From the Velvet Revolution to the Velvet Divorce?: The National Issue in Post-Totalitarian Slovakia," in Jody Jensen and Ferenc Miszlivetz, eds., Paradoxes of Transition (Szombathely: Savaria University Press, 1993), 65–90; Karel Kosik, "The Third Munich," Telos 94 (1992–93): 145–54; Petr Příhoda, "Mutual Perceptions in Czech-Slovak Relationships," in Jiří Musil, ed., The End of Czechoslovakia (Budapest: CEU Press, 1995), 128–38; Jacques Rupnik, "The International Context," in Musil, The End of Czechoslovakia, 271–78; Jan Rychlík, "National Consciousness and the Common State (A Historical-Ethnological Analysis)," in Musil, The End of Czechoslovakia, 97–105; Jaroslav Šabata, "What Kind of a Dream Is Disappearing in Prague," Peace Review 4.4 (winter 1992): 5–10; Jan Sokol, "Štaty a Iedje," Přítomnost 6 (June 1992): 1–2; Zdeněk Suda, "Slovakia in Czech National Consciousness," in Musil, The End of Czechoslovakia, 106–27; Dušan Trestik, "Idea Štatu Československeho," Přítomnost 5 (1992): 14–15; Ludvík Vaculík et al., "Czechoslovakia without Slovakia," East European Reporter 4.5 (August 1992): 81–82.

3. Andrew C. Janos, Czechoslovakia and Yugoslavia: Ethnic Conflict and the Dissolution of Multinational States, Exploratory Essay no. 3, International Area Studies, University of California, Berkeley, 1997. For the argument that Czech and Slovak societies were converging, see Jiří Musil, "Czech and Slovak Society: Outline of a Comparative Study," Czech Sociological Review 1.1 (1993): 1–21; and Václav Průcha, "Economic Development and Relations, 1918–1989," in Musil, The End of Czechoslovakia, 40–76. For the results of public opinion polls, see Carol Skalnik Leff, The Czech and Slovak Republics: Nation versus State (Boulder, Colo.: Westview Press, 1997), 127; Radio Free Europe Report, July 4, 1992; Sharon L. Wolchik, "The Right in Czecho-Slovakia," in

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The Origins of Postcommunist Elites: From Prague Spring to the Breakup of Czechoslovakia
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Contradictions ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgements ix
  • Abbreviations xi
  • Introduction xiii
  • One - The Idea of the New Class 1
  • Two - The 1968 Purges and Their Consequences 35
  • Three - The Power of Antipolitics 59
  • Four - Games of the Upper Class 93
  • Five - The Making and Breaking of the Postcommunist Political Field 135
  • Conclusion 197
  • Appendix - The Elite and General Population Surveys 205
  • Notes 209
  • Index 231
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