8
MOTHERHOOD EXCESS, AND EMPIRE

Will the Queen never find out that she will have ten times more
influence on her children by treating them with kindness and not
trying to rule them like a despot?

Henry Ponsonby

When the Royal family is so large, and our children have (alas)
such swarms of children, to connect some few of them with the great
families of the landis an immense strength to the Monarchy and
a great link between the Royal Family and the country…. Besides
which, a new infusion of blood is an absolute necessityas the
race will ehe degenerate bodily and physically.

Queen Victoria, Your Dear Letter

Victorians liked to observe that the queen ruled her nation as a mother and her household as a monarch. Victoria had the ruling business backward, they suggested. Supposedly the queen should rule her kingdom as a monarch and her household as a mother. Putting the saying right by reversing the reversal exposes a puzzle that the witticism disguises— the problem of a model, a figure, an adequate symbol of this queen's rule. The saying reveals the culture's difficulty in imagining a queen who is also a mother. Linking the queen's maternal role to her monarchical role transgressed boundaries in the cultural imagination, as if the two kinds of authority inherently contradicted each other. Motherhood as a model for a nation appears manifestly humorous. Since nationstates derive their authority from a military model, a mother's role is patriotic} Serving the nation, the good mother sends her sons to war, knits for them, binds their wounds, and buries them. Victoria performed all these functions. During the Boer War, in addition to staying in close contact with her ministers, she "crocheted shawls for her soldiers "for the Christmas of 1898" and she sent out a box of chocolate to every man at the front with a coloured print of herself on it."2

Moreover, Victoria apparently conducted state business as if it were

-187-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Queen Victoria's Secrets
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Illustrations ix
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Chronology xiii
  • Queen Victoria's Secrets xxi
  • 1: Elements of Power 1
  • 2: Genealogies in Her Closet 23
  • 3: Dressing the Body Politic 55
  • 4: Imperialtears 79
  • 5: Queen of a Certain Age 104
  • 6: Domesticity; Or, Her Life as a Dog 127
  • 7: Petticoat Rule; Or, Victoria in Furs 156
  • 8: Motherhood Excess, and Empire 187
  • Epilogue: Victoria Amazonica 211
  • Notes 223
  • Works Cited 237
  • Index 247
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 258

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.