From Rome to Eternity: Catholicism and the Arts in Italy, ca. 1550-1650

By Pamela M. Jones; Thomas Worcester | Go to book overview
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LIST OF CONTRIBUTORS

The Editors

Pamela M. Jones is an Associate Professor of art history at the University of Massachusetts Boston. Her book Federico Borromeo and the Ambrosiana: Art Patronage and Reform in Seventeenth-Century Milan was published in 1993 by Cambridge University Press, and in Italian translation in 1997 by Vita e Pensiero in Milan. She contributed an essay on Federico Borromeo's art collection to Cesare Mozzarelli and Danilo Zardin's volume Atti del Convegno I Tempi del Concilio. Società, religione, e cultura agli inizi dell'Europa moderna (Trent: Centro Culturale il Mosaico, 1995). In 1998 she edited an issue of The Art Journal entitled The Reception of Christian Devotional Art: The Renaissance to the Present. A co-curator of the exhibition Saints and Sinners: Caravaggio and the Baroque Image, she wrote the essay [The Power of Images: Paintings and Viewers in Caravaggio's Italy] for its 1999 catalogue.

Thomas Worcester, an Associate Professor of history at The College of the Holy Cross, is the author of the book Seventeenth-Century Cultural Discourse: France and the Preaching of Bishop Camus (Berlin and New York: Mouton de Gruyter, 1997). In 1999, he published the article [Neither Married nor Cloistered: Blessed Isabelle in Catholic Reformation France,] in the Sixteenth Century Journal, and he contributed the essay [Trent and Beyond: Arts of Transformation] to the catalogue of the Saints and Sinners exhibition, which he co-curated. His chapter entitled [Catholic Sermons] appears in Preachers and People in the Reformations and Early Modern Period, edited by Larissa Taylor (Leiden: E.J. Brill, 2001), the second volume in Brill's series A New History of the Sermon.


The Other Contributors

Gauvin Alexander Bailey is an Assistant Professor of art history at Clark University. His recent scholarly projects include the exhibition The Jesuits and the Grand Mogul: Renaissance Art at the Imperial Court of India 1580–1630, held at the Freer Gallery of Art in Washington in

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