Aphra Behn's English Feminism: Wit and Satire

By Dolors Altaba-Artal | Go to book overview

10
Aphra Behn's “Unfortunate” Novels:
The Unfortunate Happy Lady: A True
History and The Unfortunate Bride; or,
The Blind Lady a Beauty

AT THE END OF THE 1680S, THE CONTRAST BETWEEN THE COUNTRY'S prosperity and Aphra Behn's personally trying times is appalling. The Toleration Act consolidated “the settlement of 1689” and “stood the test of time. It led not only to a new and wider liberty … but to renewed vigor and efficiency in the body politic and in the government of the Empire.” World trade, commercial enterprises, and financial institutions were blooming in an empire in full expansion, while Behn, appropriately called “a committed European,” was “drawing her intellectual life-blood from Catholic Europe.”1 Work and difficulties never prevented Behn from aiding writers and friends. Before his suicide, she “assisted Otway when his other friends deserted him.” Yet she was, at the time, as poor as he was. Toward the end, she overworked herself, translating Latin and French texts, producing plays, and creating novels and poems at great speed in spite of suffering “rheumatic disease … and distorting pain.”2

The novels Behn wrote in this period reveal the inner thoughts of the heroines, illustrating Rose A. Zimbardo's Fourth Stage, for “a new poetic form, the novel, being invented to accommodate a new understanding of nature … purports to imitate the actual, to be an accurate account of real events and people” (Z, 8). Behn's clever prose containing the dialogized alien voice also exemplifies M. M. Bakhtin's ideas, and accordingly, her work is best understood through Bakhtin. He begins the essay “Discourse in the Novel” by stating that “the study of verbal art can and must overcome the divorce between an abstract 'formal' approach and

-182-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Aphra Behn's English Feminism: Wit and Satire
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 3
  • Contents 7
  • Preface 9
  • 1- Introduction- Before Aphra Behn 15
  • 2- Theology to Humanism 26
  • 3- Spanish Tale and Echoes 46
  • 4- Cape and Sword Plays 64
  • 5- The Heyday of Restoration Comedy 89
  • 6- Novelistic Drama 107
  • 7- Aphra Behn''s First Novel 127
  • 8- Aphra Behn''s "Nun" Novels 146
  • 9- Aphra Behn''s "Mistake" Novels 164
  • 10- Aphra Behn''s "Unfortunate" Novels 182
  • Coda 202
  • Notes 206
  • Bibliography 220
  • Index 226
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 232

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.