Impartial Stranger: History and Intertextuality in Gibbon's Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire

By Peter Cosgrove | Go to book overview

Acknowledgements

I SHOULD LIKE TO EXPRESS MY THANKS AND APPRECIATION TO THOSE PEOPLE whose advice and encouragement was invaluable to me in the preparation of this work. Firstly to Patricia Craddock at the University of Florida at Gainesville whose knowledge of Gibbon is unsurpassed. Her generous donation of her valuable time to read over and comment on large portions of the manuscript at all stages of its development is much appreciated. Even where she signaled her disagreement with the views expressed in the book her opinions were of enormous assistance. Everett Zimmerman at UC Santa Barbara stimulated me to reexamine some of the theories of history which inform my approach to Gibbon and graciously read and advised me on several of the chapters. At my home institution of Dartmouth College, Donald Pease was very helpful over many pleasant lunches, and his advice on the organization of the book cleared my path at a difficult stage. The comments of Jonathan Crewe also contributed to the formation of the book.

Thanks to Dominick LaCapra not only for pointing out some inconsistencies in the argument of Chapter 4 but also for his kind attention to Selima; thanks also to Michael Seidel, Stephen Marcus, and Edward Said whose inspiration has been far-reaching and profound.

Finally, my deep sense of gratitude to Terri Clerico who listened patiently to ideas when they were still at the formative stage and kindly forgave me for the many nights spent on Lhowon.

-11-

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Impartial Stranger: History and Intertextuality in Gibbon's Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 5
  • Contents 9
  • Acknowledgements 11
  • Introduction 13
  • Chapter 1 - Tropes of Transcendence 48
  • Chapter 2 - Pandemonium and Romance 100
  • Chapter 3 - The Genres of the Fact 160
  • Chapter 4 - Translating the Sources: Dialogue or Bricolage? 199
  • Conclusion 252
  • Notes 255
  • Bibliography 273
  • Index 282
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