Personal Relationships: Implications for Clinical and Community Psychology

By Barbara R. Sarason; Steve Duck | Go to book overview
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ABOUT THE AUTHORS

Linda K. Acitelli is an Associate Professor in the Department of Psychology at the University of Houston. Her research on relationships has been funded by the National Institute of Mental Health. Her major research interests are cognition and communication in relationships, specifically thinking and talking about relationships and the factors that determine their impact on individual and relationship well-being. In 1995, the International Network on Personal Relationships awarded her the Gerald R. Miller Award for her early career achievements.

Hoda Badr is currently a Ph.D. candidate in social psychology at the University of Houston. She also received her Master–s degree in psychology from the University of Houston. Her current research focuses on the impact of chronic illness on the communication and provision of social support in marital relationships with an emphasis on factors related to well-spouse coping and adjustment.

Matthew Brooker is presently completing his B. A. in psychology at the University of Washington. He has worked as a research assistant on the SHARE project for three years, and is completing a Senior Honors Thesis that focuses on the consequences of childhood abuse for homeless teens. After finishing his degree, he plans to attend medical school.

Rebecca M. Buchanan is a doctoral candidate in clinical and community psychology at the University of Maryland. She received her M. A. degree in the same field from the University of Maryland in 1994 after earning a B. A. in psychology from Williams College in 1990. Her research interests focus on the acculturation and adaptation of adolescent refugees and immigrants as they negotiate family and school transitions. Specifically, she has conducted research on the adolescent-family adjustment of immigrants from El Salvador and is currently studying the adjustment of Evangelical Christian refugees from the former Soviet Union. As a contractor for the Refugee Mental Health Branch, Center for Mental Health Services, Substance Abuse Mental Health Services Administration, she has also prepared documents conceptualizing the social adjustment issues and available resources for Bosnian refugees and Evangelical Christian refugees from the former Soviet Union. She also served as the editorial assistant for the American Journal of Community Psychology.

Walter John Carl is a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of Communication Studies at the University of Iowa. He received his M. A. in interpersonal and organizational

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