The Impact of Public Opinion on U.S. Foreign Policy since Vietnam: Constraining the Colossus

By Richard Sobel | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 6
Vietnam II: Public Opinion and Protest's
Influence on Nixon's War

INTRODUCTION

Chapter 6 continues the explorations of the impact of public opinion and protest on U.S. Vietnam policy by looking at the Nixon administration policies after Lyndon Johnson left office. In the fall of 1968, when Richard Nixon ran for the presidency of the United States, he had sent word to President Johnson that a Nixon administration would bring vindication to the Johnson presidency for its stand on Vietnam (Ambrose, 1989, p. 283).1 In Nixon's interpretation, the majority of the public had not been antiwar but against the uncertainty of not knowing when and how the war would end. The 25 percent of the public who in June 1968 had approved of an “all-out crash effort in the hope of winning the war quickly” (Mueller, 1973, p. 91) or the 34 percent who wanted to “take a stronger stand even if it means invading North Vietnam” (Mueller, 1973, p. 92), represented a sufficient plurality for Nixon to rely on for periodic escalation and widening of the war. This he did for four more years.

Nixon was not alone in this belief. National Security Adviser Henry Kissinger and Secretary of Defense Melvin Laird were in agreement with the new president that what the American people wanted most was a decisive and honorable victory in Vietnam, but not one requiring heavy concentrations of American troops. In the context of this perception, the administration began planning the massive attack on North Vietnam known as “Duck Hook” in 1969, while it also began “Vietnamization” of the war. Separately, the administration undertook the invasion of Cambodia in the spring of 1970, after a fourteen-month period of secret bombing of its countryside. Duck Hook constitutes the first benchmark of the Nixon administration. The Cambodia invasion constitutes the second benchmark.

1Just before Johnson's speech to the nation that he would not run again and would begin to
deescalate the war, Nixon planned to give a speech saying that “there was no way to win the
war.” He dropped the plans after Johnson's announcement (Hodgson, 1976. p. 396).

-80-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Impact of Public Opinion on U.S. Foreign Policy since Vietnam: Constraining the Colossus
Table of contents
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 276

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.