Policy as Practice: Toward a Comparative Sociocultural Analysis of Educational Policy

By Margaret Sutton; Bradley A.U. Levinson | Go to book overview
Save to active project

6
When Politics Becomes Pedagogy:
Oppositional Discourse as Policy in
Mexican Teachers' Struggles for
Union Democracy

Susan Street1

As democratic union leaders, we have been thinking of the teacher as a
subject in the schools, enclosed within the four walls of the classroom. We
now realize that what we need to do is to define teaching as a permanent,
all-encompassing function, as a role that goes way beyond the school itself.
The scheme I now use when working with teachers is one that tries to cor-
rect this vision of the teacher as merely a worker, which ignores the other
definitions as citizen and as educator.2


INTRODUCTION

A concept normally restricted to technical jargon has come to the fore in the social field of Mexican education. The recent centrality of autonomy does not derive solely from its increasingly important place in state policy. Indeed, and certainly not to the liking of government policymakers, the term itself has become contested precisely due to its subaltern origins as an explicitly political concept. The concept was made popular by the support the Zapatista Army of National Liberation has given since 1994 to the national indigenous movement, to "civil society" organizations, and to popular movements in general. Struggles of indigenous groups for state recognition of their right to be politically autonomous over cultural, social, and geographic territories has directed public debate to examine the concept itself. This debate has underlined the idea of autonomy as the self-determination of a collective people, a notion rescued from previous historical periods and made concrete by the autonomous

-145-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
Loading One moment ...
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Policy as Practice: Toward a Comparative Sociocultural Analysis of Educational Policy
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen
/ 330

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.

Are you sure you want to delete this highlight?