Anthropologists in the Field: Cases in Participant Observation

By Lynne Hume; Jane Mulcock | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 2
Disclosure and Interaction in a Monastery

Michael V. Angrosino

I am a cultural anthropologist/oral historian, and this essay is a reflection on a project I conducted for the centennial of Cassian Abbey (a pseudonym), a Benedictine monastery. During the period of research (one month of intensive interviewing, plus several short follow-up visits), I lived at the monastery and adhered to the monastic rule. I am a practicing Roman Catholic who has tended to look on monasticism as a revered but increasingly irrelevant anachronism. Living briefly at the monastery was a welcome spiritual and emotional respite from the racket of the "real world," and the research allowed me to interact with the monks as real people, and not as holdovers from a glorious but fading tradition. But I knew that the monastic life was not one to which I would be personally suited on a long-term basis, and thereby hangs a tale….


Setting the Stage

At the time of the research, there were thirty-five monks in residence at Cassian, another dozen or so having been given special permission to work outside the monastery as teachers, pastors, and chaplains. The Cassian community supported itself through the management of extensive agricultural properties, supplemented by the hosting of religious retreats, workshops, and conferences. The monastic community founded, and for many decades ran, a small liberal arts college whose campus is adjacent to the monastery grounds; however, the college and the monastery are now separate administrative entities.

Like all Benedictine foundations, Cassian is autonomous in governance, although it has "fraternal links" to the other monasteries around

-18-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Anthropologists in the Field: Cases in Participant Observation
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 270

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.